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Multivitamin Use By Older Men Does Not Affect Cardiovascular Health

November 5, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
An older man’s likelihood of experiencing a heart attack, stroke, or death from cardiovascular disease is not reduced by taking a daily multivitamin, a U.S. study has found. The researchers noted that there remains some doubt about the long-term benefits of daily multivitamin use, especially as a way to prevent cardiovascular disease. For the study, researchers analyzed data regarding multivitamin use and major cardiovascular events from a large trial – 14,641 physicians were enrolled – designed to look at multivitamin impact on cancer. They found no significant effect on rates of congestive heart failure, angina, and coronary revascularization, or on total heart attacks, stroke, or other cardiovascular events.
Howard D. Sesso et al. , "Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Men", JAMA, November 05, 2012, © American Medical Association
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
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Food & Nutrition
Men's Health
Other Men's Health
Aging
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Food & Nutrition
Pills & Supplements
Vitamins
Cancer & Cancer Prevention
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Worldwide
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United States of America

Aroma Of Freshly-Baked Bread Inspires Selflessness, Study Finds

November 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in France have found that the sweet smell of bread baking triggers a positive mood and leads to more altruistic deeds toward strangers. The study looked at behaviors of people who walked past a clothing boutique and a bakery, finding that shoppers near the bakery were more likely to alert passersby -- actually study volunteers -- that they had dropped something. The experiments, which were repeated about 400 times, found that when the volunteers dropped items outside the bakery with its aroma of freshly-baked bread, 77 percent of strangers stopped to help recover a “lost” item and hand it back to the owner. Outside the clothing store, however, only 52 percent of strangers helped.
"The One Smell That Will Make You A Kinder Person (Hint: It’s Delicious)", WestPenn Journal, November 03, 2012, © WestPenn Journal
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
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Happiness & Contentment
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France

Functional Wheat-Rye Bread Could Help Treat Diabetes

November 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists from Slovakia who developed a functional wheat-rye bread said a small clinical trial showed that the formula reduces glucose levels after it is eaten, and could be used in diabetes and obesity treatment programs. The bread is enriched with cereal dietary fiber (10 percent wheat germ), beta-glucan hydrogel (12.5 percent) and sourdough starter (lactobacilli) culture. The higher acidity levels caused by the lactobacilli strains may reduce acute glycemic and insulinemic responses. The sourdough, beta-glucan and extruded wheat bran changed biologically active compounds, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Higher levels of polyphenols and flavonoids led to increased antioxidant activity.
Kacey Culliney , "Fortified wheat-rye bread could aid diabetes and obesity prevention, study", Bakery and Snacks, November 02, 2012, © William Reed Business media SAS
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
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Diabetes
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Slovakia

Shopper Awareness Is One Of Key Emerging Trends In The Food Industry In 2013

November 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Among the key emerging trends likely to have an impact on the food and drinks market in 2013 are two especially important ones, according to Innova Market Insights. First is the “aware shopper”, who is more informed about value and health and supported by lobby groups, non-governmental organizations and celebrities. All are calling for more transparency, credibility and accountability from the food industry. Second is the fact that lawsuits and regulatory pressure are having an impact on products claiming to be “natural.” The result is that some companies are now claiming products are "additive-/preservative-free" and “GMO-free”, rather than natural.
"Top Trends for 2013 - Aware Shopper Forces Manufacturer Accountability", Press release, Innova Market Insights, November 01, 2012, © PR Newswire
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Adding Distillers Grains To Flatbread Dough Boosts Fiber, Protein Content

November 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. food scientist has shown that food grade distillers grains can be used to fortify traditional Asian flatbreads with protein and fiber. His hope is that distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) can be used to improve the nutritional value of unleavened flatbread known as chapatti. DDGS is a co-product when corn is processed into ethanol. In lab studies Padu Krishnan of South Dakota State University and colleagues found that using DDGS to make up 20 percent of  the dough increased the fiber to 10.3 percent; using 20 percent DDGS increased the protein to 15.3 percent. If manufacturers begin using DDGS to fortify products in human diets, corn producers from the American Midwest and elsewhere could tap a vast new market, according to Krishnan.
Tim Sherno, "Food Scientist Produces Nutrition-Adding Stealth Ingredient ", KSTP.com, November 01, 2012, © A Hubbard Broadcasting Company
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To Reduce Exposure To Arsenic In Rice Products, Parents Should Feed Babies Wheat, Oatmeal Cereals

November 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Consumers Union, reporting in its magazine Consumer Reports, says it found varying levels of the poison arsenic in more than 60 rices and rice products, including baby foods. Some infant rice cereals contained five times the levels of inorganic arsenic found in alternatives such as oatmeal. One of CU’s key recommendations to parents about reducing the risk of arsenic poisoning: babies should eat no more than one serving of infant rice cereal a day on average, and their diets should include cereals made from wheat, oatmeal or corn grits, “which contain significantly lower levels of arsenic.”
"Arsenic in your food", Consumer Reports, November 01, 2012, © Consumers Union of U.S., Inc.
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Common Food Preservative May Someday Be Used To Fight Oral And Other Cancers

November 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The commonly used antibacterial food preservative nicin may someday be used to treat head and neck squamous cell cancers because it slows and even stops cancer cell proliferation, University of Michigan researchers have found. The researchers, noting that nicin was deemed safe for human consumption decades ago, said it should be relatively easy to get FDA approval for clinical trials. Antibacterial agents like nisin alter cell properties in bacteria to render it harmless. The Michigan study found that nisin also alters cancer cell properties, slowing cell proliferation and causing cell death by activating a protein called CHAC1 in cancer cells, a protein known to influence cell death.
Nam E. Joo et al., "Nisin, an apoptogenic bacteriocin and food preservative, attenuates HNSCC tumorigenesis via CHAC1", Cancer Medicine, November 01, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons
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High Levels Of Vitamin D In The Blood Associated With Reduced Risk Of Bladder Cancer

October 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Spanish researchers have found a significant link between levels of vitamin D in the blood and the risk of bladder cancer. Study authors analyzed blood samples from 2,000 hospital patients, some of whom had bladder cancer and some of whom did not. They found that those who had the highest levels of 25(OH)D3 in the blood had the least risk of bladder cancer. The results suggest that increasing  the dietary or supplementary intake of vitamin D, or getting more sun exposure, might benefit patients in terms of prevention and treatment.
A. F. Amaral et al., "Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 and Bladder Cancer Risk According to Tumor Stage and FGFR3 Status", Journal of the National Cancer Institute, October 31, 2012, © Amaral et al.
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Spain

Beverage Thickness Increases Expectations Of Satiety – Study

October 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in the U.K. who tested the effect of different beverage combinations on expectations of satiety found that people assumed thicker drinks would make them feel fuller longer. Expectations of satiety – the thin, thick, creamy and high- and low-calorie drinks were rated against hypothetical pasta and sauce dishes of different sizes – were boosted by thick drinks even when other drink combinations had the same number of calories. Creamy flavors and higher calorie content did not increase the expected impact on hunger. The researchers said figuring out how to make drinks feel more filling without increasing their caloric content could help mitigate the impact on weight.
Keri McCrickerd et al., "Subtle changes in the flavour and texture of a drink enhance expectations of satiety", Flavour, October 31, 2012, © McCrickerd et al.
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Omega-3s From Oily Fish – But Not From Supplements – Shown To Prevent Stroke

October 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
British and Dutch researchers who analyzed data from 38 studies involving 800,000 individuals have found that eating just two servings of oily fish a week significantly reduces the chances of suffering a stroke. The same effect, however, was not found from taking fish oil supplements. Participants who ate two to four servings of fish like salmon, sardines, herring, etc., a week had a moderate but significant six percent lower risk of cerebrovascular disease compared with those eating one or fewer servings of fish a week. Participants who ate five or more servings a week had a 12 percent lower risk. The researchers suggested several reasons for the results, including the possibility that eating fish precludes consumption of harmful foods like red meat.
Rajiv Chowdhury et al., "Association between fish consumption, long chain omega 3 fatty acids, and risk of cerebrovascular disease", BMJ, October 31, 2012, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
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Meals High In Saturated Fats Do Immediate Damage To Blood Vessels

October 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Canadian clinical trial that measured the effects of different types of meals on the inner lining of blood vessels in 28 nonsmoking men found that a meal loaded with saturated fats damages arteries. In contrast, a Mediterranean-style meal rich in good (mono- and polyunsaturated) fats caused no damage at all to blood vessels, and may even have had a beneficial effect. For the study, the men ate a meal composed of salmon, almonds, and vegetables cooked in olive oil. Arteries of the study participants dilated normally. The second meal included a sausage sandwich, an egg, cheese, and three hash browns. Arteries dilated 24 percent less than in the fasting state.
J. Cantin et al., "Does the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet Influence Baseline and Postprandial Endothelial Function?", Canadian Journal of Cardiology, October 30, 2012, © Canadian Cardiovascular Society
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Soybean Initiative Spreads The Good Word About Baking With Soy Flour

October 29, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The American Soybean Association recently sponsored a five-day course in North Dakota that taught seven bakers from Senegal and Rwanda about the benefits of adding soy to baked products. According to an official of the Northern Crops Institute, a collaborative effort among North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, and South Dakota, adding soy flour to baked goods raises protein levels, balances essential amino acids and increases bread’s nutritional value. All of these virtues make soy flour a promising use of soybeans in countries around the world, according to NCI. Courses also focused on calculating calories, using cost spreadsheets, and describing the  various kinds of wheats and their flour characteristics.
"African bakers attend Northern Crops Institute short course", News release, North Dakota State University, October 29, 2012, © North Dakota State University
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New Database Lists Adverse Effects Of 700 Medications, Supplements, On Liver

October 26, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A new National Institutes of Health online database of 700 medications, and herbal and dietary supplements, shows that many can be toxic to the liver. The searchable Livertox database shows, for example, that kava, comfrey, valerian, vitamin A, niacin and green tea, when taken in high doses, have been linked to liver injury and disease. Loyola University’s Steven Scaglione, M.D., who specializes in liver transplantation and research, praises the new NIH database, noting that consumers have become aware in recent years of the dangers of taking too much acetaminophen, but are relatively ignorant of the risk of liver injury presented by certain popular herbal and dietary supplements.
Steven Scaglione, M.D., "Dietary Supplements Can Cause Liver Injury, Says Hepatologist", Press release, Loyola University Health System, October 26, 2012, © Loyola University Health System
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Young Adults Can Improve Working Memory With Omega-3 Supplements

October 25, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Numerous studies have linked omega-3 fatty acids to a variety of health benefits. But a new U.S. clinical study found that 11 healthy young adults (ages 18 to 25) boosted their memory by increasing omega-3 intake. Participants in the study, which was not placebo-controlled, took an omega-3 fish oil supplement (FDA-approved Lovaza) daily for six months after various tests were performed, including brain imaging scans. At six months, participants underwent blood tests and completed working memory tests, including the “n-back test”. The working memory of the participants was shown to be greatly improved over pre-study results. The researchers were disappointed, however, that brain imaging  tests did not reveal the mechanism of enhanced memory.
Rajesh Narendran et al., "Improved Working Memory but No Effect on Striatal Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2 after Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation", PLoS ONE, October 25, 2012, © Narendran et al.
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
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Worldwide
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United States of America

Some Herbal/Dietary Supplements Are Dangerous When Taken With Prescription Medications

October 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A comprehensive research review by Chinese and U.S. scientists has found that certain herbal and dietary supplements can be harmful when taken with prescription medications. The researchers analyzed 54 review articles and 31 original studies, finding particularly serious adverse effects when prescription drugs were taken with St. John’s Wort, magnesium, calcium, iron or ginkgo biloba. The greatest number of supplement interaction problems were with Warfarin, insulin, aspirin, digoxin and ticlopidine. Most of the interaction problems were caused by the supplements altering the way a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized and eliminated by the body.
H.-H. Tsai et al., "Evaluation of documented drug interactions and contraindications associated with herbs and dietary supplements: a systematic literature review", International Journal of Clinical Practice, October 24, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
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Nestlé Supports Initiative To Prevent, Treat Childhood Obesity

October 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Nestlé announced it is sponsoring an organization whose primary goal is to help prevent and treat childhood obesity. The Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), will be funded and supported by a variety of government and other sources. The Institute will focus on creating healthy feeding and dietary patterns in the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. It will produce resources on childhood obesity for health professionals, communities and parents, based on government policies and scientific evidence, according to Nestlé.
"Nestlé backs healthy childhood weight initiative in the United States", Press release, Nestlé, October 24, 2012, © Nestlé
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Kid's Health
Babies
Pre-School/School
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Frightened By Food Contamination Incidents, Chinese Consumers Go Organic

October 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The organic food sector in China is benefiting from consumer reaction to recent food safety problems, according to market researcher Mintel. Eighty percent of Chinese consumers say protecting themselves from food contamination is a major reason they are willing to pay more for organic foods and beverages. Fifty-six percent of Chinese consumers in metropolitan areas say they now spend more on organic foods, and the same number say they have bought organic fresh foods and drinks in the past year. Most popular organic foods purchased by Chinese consumers: fresh milk (37 percent), cooking oil (35 percent), pork (33 percent), beef (26 percent) and chicken (26 percent). Three-fourths of Chinese consumers do their organic shopping at supermarkets.
"Growth in Organic products in China as consumers adopt multiple self protection strategies", Oxygen Report, Mintel, October 23, 2012, © Mintel
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
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China

New Challenge For The Food Industry: Reducing Acrylamide Levels In Baked, Fried Products

October 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Acrylamide – an odorless, tasteless, invisible carcinogenic nerve poison – forms naturally in carbohydrate-rich, starchy foods when they're fried, baked, grilled, toasted or roasted at high temperatures. Now an international study of 1,100 pregnant women has demonstrated a link between the obscure chemical and the risk of bearing babies with lower birth weights and smaller head circumferences. These outcomes in turn have been associated with health problems such as delayed development of the brain and nervous system, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The researchers advised pregnant women to eat fewer potato chips and French fries and more fruits and vegetables. “The food industry must also explore effective ways of reducing acrylamide levels in its products,” they warned.
Joanna Blythman, "Could eating burnt toast stunt your unborn baby's growth?", Daily Mail, October 23, 2012, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
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Lifting Weights Reduces Risk Of Metabolic Syndrome

October 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who analyzed data from a national health and nutrition survey found that those who said they lifted weights were less likely to have the cluster of risk factors associated with heart disease and diabetes. The risk factors – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – include large waist, high triglyceride levels, low HDL levels, high blood pressure and high glucose levels. The analysis found that metabolic syndrome was not as prevalent among people who lifted weights: 24.6 percent, compared to 37.3 percent. After adjusting for demographic factors, people who lifted weights were 37 percent less likely to have metabolic syndrome.
Peter M. Magyari et al., "Lifting Weights Protects Against Metabolic Syndrome, Study Suggests", The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, October 23, 2012, © National Strength and Conditioning Association
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Vitamin B3 Found To Counteract Muscle Degeneration Of Muscular Dystrophy

October 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study in zebrafish models of muscular dystrophy has found that muscle structure and function were improved by supplying a common cellular chemical – or its precursor vitamin B3 – to activate a cell adhesion pathway. Activation of the pathway counteracts the muscle degeneration ad reduced mobility caused by muscular dystrophies. The researchers said that their findings are especially important for congenital muscular dystrophies, which are progressive,  debilitating and often lethal.
Michelle F. Goody et al., "NAD Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy", PLoS Biology, October 23, 2012, © Goody et al.
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
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Legume Diet Reduces Risk Of Heart Disease Among Diabetics

October 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
People with type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of coronary heart disease by eating more legumes as part of a low-glycemic index (GI) diet, a three-month clinical study by Canadian researchers has found. The study tested the effects of eating more legumes – beans, chickpeas or lentils – on 121 type 2 diabetes patients. Patients were assigned randomly to eat either a low-GI legume diet (one cup a day) or a diet with increased soluble fiber in the form of whole wheat products. The low-GI legume diet had a positive impact on glycemic control, blood lipid levels and blood pressure, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.
Jenkins DA et al., "Effect of Legumes as Part of a Low Glycemic Index Diet on Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus", Archives of Internal Medicine, October 22, 2012, © American Medical Association
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Exercise – Not Mental Stimulation – Staves Off Brain Shrinkage In Elderly

October 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scottish researchers who studied nearly 700 people in their seventies and older found that those who exercised regularly showed less brain shrinkage over three years than those who were more sedentary. The researchers used MRI scams top measure the volume of brain tissue and the volume and health of the brain’s white matter in study participants. They also did not find any benefit to brain health for older people who participated in social or mentally stimulating activities. "Our results suggest that to maintain brain health, physical activity may be more beneficial than choosing more sedentary activities,” the researchers said.
A. J. Gow et al., "Neuroprotective lifestyles and the aging brain: Activity, atrophy, and white matter integrity", Neurology, October 22, 2012, © AAN Enterprises, Inc.
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Organic Produce Not Healthier Than Conventional – Until You Take Into Account Pesticide Levels

October 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The American Academy of Pediatrics has conducted an in-depth analysis of scientific evidence regarding the nutritional benefit of organic fruits and vegetables, finding that they have the same vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, etc., as conventionally grown produce – but without the pesticide residues. The AAP said that low pesticide levels could be a significant factor for young children. The researchers said no one really knows whether differences in pesticide levels have an adverse health impact over a lifetime, but "we do know that children – especially young children whose brains are developing – are uniquely vulnerable to chemical exposures."
Joel Forman & Janet Silverstein, "Organic Foods: Health and Environmental Advantages and Disadvantages", Pediatrics, October 22, 2012, © American Academy of Pediatrics
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Gluten-free Bakers Have Some Time To Worry About Celiac Disease Vaccine

October 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
American biotech  company ImmusanT has developed a celiac disease vaccine that is undergoing clinical testing in New Zealand, Australia and the U.S. With the gluten-free market likely to be worth as much as US$375.5 million within a couple of years, are bakers who produce gluten-free products feeling threatened by the advancement? Not yet, they say. Availability of the novel vaccine – Nexvax2 would reduce the immune system’s adverse response to gluten – is still 10 to 15 years away.
Georgi Gyton, "Could vaccine threaten gluten-free bakery?", Bakery Info, October 22, 2012, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
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Delicious Baked Goods That Are Also Healthy? It’s Possible, U.K. Bakers Say

October 19, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
There are ways to provide healthy, and tasty, baked goods to health-conscious consumers, according to food writer Samantha Edwards, who surveyed a selection of prominent British bakers. The basic strategy is to cut back on “indulgent ingredients,” such as fat, sugar, artificial colorings, flavorings and preservatives, while adding fiber, whole grains and natural flavors.  Trends include breakfast sandwich wraps and turnovers wrapped in soft bread as alternatives to morning pastries. One baker, Delice de France, offers a selection of breads for the lunch crowd that include sourdoughs and whole grains. Other innovations: breakfast muffins containing dates, apricots, raisins, pumpkin seeds and granola; mini versions of cupcakes; and low-GI carrot cupcakes with fresh fruit.
"A Healthy Starter", British Baker, October 19, 2012, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
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Quest For “Real” Food Is Part Of A Broader Trend Among Consumers

October 18, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Fast Company has gathered evidence of a broad lifestyle trend among consumers: the quest for “realness” in food, behaviors, products, experiences, etc. The “real” movement in food extends beyond being a “locavore” to include concerns about food safety and health. During the recession, sales of natural and organic food and beverages increased 20 percent since 2009. In response to the demand for realness, food manufacturers have cut the number of product ingredients in 56 percent of food categories. “Better for you” snack foods are popping up all over the place. In the food/lifestyle category, there has been an increase in cooking among young people who simply find it a good way to connect with friends. 
Mike Doherty, "The Story Behind The Stuff: Consumers' Growing Interest In "Real" Products", Fast Company, October 18, 2012, © Mansueto Ventures LLC
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Higher Calcium Intake Lowers Risk Of Thyroid Problems In Older Women

October 18, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Women whose diet is low in calcium run the risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), a condition in which an overactive thyroid secretes too much parathyroid hormone, leading to weak bones, fractures and kidney stones, a study finds. U.S. researchers collected data beginning in 1986 on 58,354 women aged 39 to 66 years. They measured calcium intake from dietary sources and supplements every four years. Women with the highest intake of dietary calcium had a 44 percent lower risk of developing PHPT than those with the lowest intake. Even women who took a modest 500 mg/day of calcium supplements had a 59 percent lower risk than those who took no supplement.
Paik JM et al., "Calcium intake and risk of primary hyperparathyroidism in women: prospective cohort study", BMJ, October 18, 2012, © Paik JM et al.
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Antioxidant-Rich Diet Of Fruits, Vegetables Significantly Reduces Heart Attack Risk In Women

October 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in Sweden who tracked the dietary patterns of 32,561 women over ten years in a population-based cohort study found that total dietary antioxidant intake from fruits, vegetables, coffee, chocolate and whole grains, was important in the prevention of heart attack (myocardial infarction). A diet of fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants reduced the risk of heart attack in women aged 49 to 83 by as much as 29 percent. The researchers acknowledged that the study was conducted among women and therefore could not be generalized to men.
Susanne Rautiainen et al., "Total Antioxidant Capacity from Diet and Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort of Women", American Journal of Medicine, October 17, 2012, © Elsevier Inc
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Study Finds That Plant-Based Flavonoids Reduce Risk Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

October 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers who analyzed data from questionnaires completed by nearly 2,000 African-American and European men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer found a link between consumption of plant-based flavonoids prior to diagnosis and a reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer. What made the difference was consuming a variety of plant-based foods and beverages, such as fruits, vegetables, herbs and tea. The researchers found that no individual subclass of flavonoids worked better than the others. So “it is important to consume a variety of plant-based foods in the diet, rather than to focus on one specific type of flavonoid or flavonoid-rich food."
Susan E. Steck et al., "Increased Flavonoid Intake Reduced Risk for Aggressive Prostate Cancer", News release, presentation at the AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, October 17, 2012, © American Association for Cancer Research
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Daily Multivitamin Reduces Cancer Risk In Men

October 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Taking a daily multivitamin seems to significantly reduce the risk of cancer in men, according to the results of the first long-term clinical trial on the impact of multivitamins on cancer. Researchers tracked nearly 15,000 men who took either a multivitamin or a placebo for more than 10 years. The men themselves reported whether they had been diagnosed with cancer. The researchers found that those who took a daily multivitamin had eight percent fewer cancer diagnoses compared with the group taking the placebo. The multivitamins were also associated with an apparent reduction in cancer deaths.
J. Michael Gaziano et al. , "Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians' Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial", JAMA, October 17, 2012, © American Medical Association
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HEALTH & WELLNESS
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Men's Health
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United States of America

Imaging Studies Show Connection Between The Brain And Diet-Related Problems

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists recently presented a raft  of studies that used advanced imaging technology to draw connections between our diet, the way we think and what we think. Researchers found that the brain plays a significant role in dietary disorders such as obesity, diabetes, binge eating and the attractiveness of high-calorie meals. For example, neurological imaging shows that when people skip breakfast, pictures of high-calorie food activate the pleasure-seeking part of the brain. Skipping breakfast leads to increased food consumption at lunch, suggesting that fasting is not an effective form of diet control. 
"This Is Your Brain On Food: Studies Reveal How Diet Affects Brain Functions", News release, abstracts presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, October 16, 2012, © Society For NeuroScience
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Krill Oil May Soon Be Second Largest Category Of Omega-3 Supplements

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Data from SPINSscan – an information source on UPC-coded natural products sold in supermarkets – shows that krill oil has grown 43 percent in the natural products channel during the last year. This growth significantly outpaced growth of other sources of omega-3s, according to Aker BioMarine, a supplier of krill ingredients. The company said it believes krill supplement sales will soon become the second largest category of omega-3 supplements in food, drug and mass. The growth in krill oil sales is probably the result of the high interest in krill oil in the food, drug and mass channel, where krill supplements grew 70 percent last year.
"Krill oil omega-3 sales grow 43%", News article, NewHope360, October 16, 2012, © Penton Media Inc
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Overeating Impairs The Brain’s Ability To Detect Insulin Signals, Which Can Lead To Diabetes

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study in animals has found a connection between overeating and a brain malfunction associated with poor insulin control and eventually diabetes. Overeating impairs the ability of brain insulin to suppress glucose release from the liver and lipolysis in fat tissue. When a person  overeats, the brain becomes unresponsive to important clues such as insulin, which then leads to diabetes. According to the researchers, the study shows “that it is really the brain that is harmed first [in overeating] which then starts the downward spiral."
T. Scherer et al., "Short Term Voluntary Overfeeding Disrupts Brain Insulin Control of Adipose Tissue Lipolysis", Journal of Biological Chemistry, October 16, 2012, © American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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Food Industry Expert Urges Tighter Legislative Control Over Nanotechnology Use

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Nanotechnology is used in the production of consumer and health goods, including food, food packaging and sun block products. Nanoparticles easily penetrate DNA structures and the cells of the lungs, skin and digestive system, raising concerns in the health and consumer community. The U.S. FDA studied the issue but found no reason for more extensive regulation of nanoparticles, a decision criticized by environmental and other groups. Food industry expert Adam Soliman, in an opinion article, acknowledges that the long-term effects of nanoparticle use may be positive, but suggests there may be negative effects on health. “Thus, jurisdictions [globally] should continue to broaden legislation monitoring the development of nanotechnology.”
Adam Soliman, "The Need for Stronger Nanotechnology Regulation", Food Safety News, October 16, 2012, © Marler Clark
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Concern About Food Supply Contamination Is Constant In U.S., But Fluctuates With The News

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
During the first eight months of this year, about one in four Americans said they were extremely concerned about food safety issues and 60 percent said they were somewhat or slightly concerned, the NPD Group found. Only 15 percent said they were not at all concerned about food safety. NPD said these figures are relatively constant, but fluctuate when there is a food safety issue in the news. For example, concern about listeria contamination peaked during the time the outbreaks were widely reported (July and August) and then leveled off when the news subsided.
"U.S. Consumers Are Only Somewhat or Slightly Concerned About the Safety of U.S. Food Supply Despite Frequent Food Safety Outbreaks, Reports NPD", Press release, NPD, October 16, 2012
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Cognitive Impairment In Elderly Is Worse If Diet Is Heavy In Carbs, Sugar

October 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Mayo Clinic scientists who tracked 940 people aged 70 to 89 who provided regular information about their diets found that those who consumed a lot of carbohydrates were significantly more likely to experience mild cognitive impairment. The risk was even greater among those whose diet was heavy in sugar. Those who consumed a lot of protein and fat relative to carbohydrates were less likely to become cognitively impaired. At the start of the study participants showed no signs of cognitive impairment. But after four years 200 of those 940 were beginning to show mild cognitive impairment. When total fat and protein intake were taken into account, people with the highest carbohydrate intake were 3.6 times likelier to become cognitively impaired.
Rosebud O. Roberts et al., "Relative Intake of Macronutrients Impacts Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia", Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, October 16, 2012, © Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
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Nestlé/General Mills Joint Venture To Cut Sugar Levels, Improve Nutrition, In 20 Breakfast Cereals

October 15, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A joint venture created by Nestlé and General Mills says it is committed to cutting sugar levels to  nine grams in 20 cereal brands marketed to children and teenagers by 2015. Cereal Partners Worldwide will cut sugar content up to 30 percent across brands like Nesquik, Chocapic, Honey Cheerios, and Milo. CPW will also improve the nutritional value of the products, adding, for example, whole grain in all new recipes. Calcium per serving will be increased to at least 15 percent of the RDA, which varies in different parts of the world. The sodium content will also be reduced to 135mg or less per serving.
Press Release, Nestlé , "Nestlé breakfast cereals make it easier to have a nutritious start to the day", Nestlé , October 15, 2012, © Nestlé
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Premature Babies With Damaged Intestines Could Benefit From Prebiotic Feeding

October 15, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Children who have suffered from intestinal failure could benefit from adding the right prebiotics to their diet, a U.S. study has found in piglets. The researchers fed the newborn pigs the carbohydrate fructooligosacharide (FOS) as a prebiotic. Many premature infants develop necrotizing enterocolitis, a kind of gangrene of the intestine and have to be fed intravenously once the damaged parts of the intestine are surgically removed. The new research found that by adding FOS to the piglets’ diet, the gut grew and increased in function. FOS enters the intestines where bacteria convert it into butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid that increases the size of the intestines and their ability to digest and absorb nutrients.
J. L. Barnes et al., " Intestinal Adaptation Is Stimulated by Partial Enteral Nutrition Supplemented With the Prebiotic Short-Chain Fructooligosaccharide in a Neonatal Intestinal Failure Piglet Model", Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, October 15, 2012, © The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
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Irish Scientists Explore Uses Of Seaweed Protein In Functional Foods

October 12, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Ireland’s agri-food R&D agency Teagasc says it is researching the possibility of using proteins derived from seaweed in functional foods, including bread. Scientists have known for some time that protein-rich red seaweeds such as the Palmaria palmata and Porphyra species could someday be used to develop low-cost, nutritious diets that might compete with protein crops such as soy beans. Protein isolated from seaweed could be used for technical purposes in food manufacture, for example in making reduced fat products. One project underway at Teagasc is focusing on a bread product to determine the impact of P. palmata protein on the moisture content, ash, crude fat, fiber and protein content, as well as the color and texture, of bread.
"Seaweed: An Alternative Protein Source", News release, Teagasc, October 12, 2012, © Teagasc
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Active Polyphenol In Turmeric Inhibits Metastasis Of Prostate Cancer Cells

October 12, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
German and Italian scientists who tested the effect of curcumin, the active polyphenol in the spice turmeric responsible for the color of curry, in mouse models of prostate cancer found that it inhibits the spread of the cells, a process known as metastasis. For the study, researchers examined the molecular processes that go haywire in prostate carcinoma cells, finding that cancer cells produce proteins that promote inflammation. Curcumin, however,  decreased the expression of the proteins, and this correlated with a decline in metastases in the mice.
P. H. Killian et al., "Curcumin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Metastasis in vivo by Targeting the Inflammatory Cytokines CXCL1 and -2", Carcinogenesis, October 12, 2012, © Killian et al.
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Discovery Could Lead To Development Of Vaccine To Treat Celiac Disease

October 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by an international team of researchers has visually determined how T-cells of the immune system interact with gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley that causes celiac disease. A chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the digestive process of the small intestine, the disease affects approximately 1 in 133 people. The researchers said this is the first time the intricacies of the interaction between gluten and two proteins that initiate immune responses have been visualized at a sub-molecular level. The finding will help the company ImmusanT develop a blood test and a therapeutic vaccine, Nexvax2, that could restore immune tolerance to gluten and allow patients to again include gluten in their diet.
Sophie E. Broughton et al., "Biased T Cell Receptor Usage Directed against Human Leukocyte Antigen DQ8-Restricted Gliadin Peptides Is Associated with Celiac Disease", Immunity, October 11, 2012, © Elsevier, Inc.
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Consumer Protection Agencies In Europe Accused Of Conflict Of Interest

October 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The European Court of Auditors has criticized the Italy-based European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and three other EU agencies for conflicts of interest over consumer protection activities. ECA inspectors found fault with management at EFSA, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for being too close to the various industries they were supposed to be monitoring. The auditors said in a report that “none of the selected agencies adequately managed the conflict of interest situations." They offered several suggestions for fixing the problem, including better screening of job candidates for possible conflict of interest before appointment.
"Food safety watchdog among four slammed by EU court", News report, AFP, October 11, 2012, © Yahoo/AFP
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Food Companies Could Apply Their Effective Junk Food Marketing Tactics To Boost Healthy Eating

October 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
French and American researchers report that the marketing tactics used by food companies to get people to eat unhealthy fast foods could be applied to get them to eat healthy foods, and would be just as profitable. Consumers respond to the same marketing techniques, especially price reduction, whether they’re buying healthy or unhealthy foods. Food companies therefore could, for example, induce consumers to buy diet drinks – or milk, juice or water – instead of sugary beverages by offering meal discounts as an incentive. The researchers say this is a “win-win” situation: healthier consumers and profitable companies.
Pierre Chandon & Brian Wansink, "Does food marketing need to make us fat? A review and solutions", Nutrition Reviews, October 11, 2012, © International Life Sciences Institute
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Supplement Users Are Very Concerned About Heart Health – Survey

October 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Canadian probiotics manufacturer Micropharma found in a consumer survey that a majority of supplement users worry about their heart health and nearly three out of four are looking for naturally sourced, clinically proven supplements targeted at cholesterol reduction. The company polled 677 U.S. supplement users, finding that 52 percent are concerned about heart health, and 40 percent express concern over digestive health. The company said it would be launching a probiotic supplement in the coming months “that will offer a safe and natural addition to a heart healthy diet and lifestyle for those consumers who want a natural solution."
"Survey Shows Supplement Users Have Strong Interest in Natural Solutions to Manage Their Cholesterol", Press release, Micropharma Limited, October 11, 2012, © Micropharma Limited
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Exercise Strengthens The Immune Systems Of Cancer Survivors, May Prevent Recurrences

October 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Cancer survivors who exercise for a few weeks after they finish chemotherapy may be tuning up their immune systems enough to prevent a recurrence of the disease, a preliminary U.S. study finds. Previous research established that exercise can reduce the risk of getting several different types of cancers, can improve prognosis in cancer patients, and can reduce the risk of recurrence of some types of cancers in survivors. The 12-week study among 16 cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy showed how: several weeks of exercise favorably changed the ratio of senescent (ineffective) immune system T cells to naïve (cancer fighting) T cells in the majority of participants.
Laura Bilek et al., "Effect of Exercise on T Cells in Cancer Survivors", News release, presentation at the Integrative Biology of Exercise VI meeting, October 10, 2012, © Bilek et al.
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Survey Finds Britons Need To Bone Up On Fiber, Nutrition Facts

October 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Though a large number of Britons – 75 percent – believe they eat a healthy, balanced diet, a survey for independent baker Warburtons has found that most are fairly ignorant about nutrition, especially when it comes to fiber. The survey found that half British adults say they get enough fiber from the foods they eat, though almost none knew what the recommended daily intake is. Most knew they get fiber from whole grain bread, rice and pasta, but they also believed they get fiber from eggs, chocolate and even beer. The U.K.’s National Health Service recommends daily fiber intake of 18 to 24 grams, but the average Briton consumes only 13 grams.
Giles Sheldrick, "Fibre In Beer? UK Clueless About Diet", Express.co.uk, October 10, 2012, © Northern and Shell Media Publications
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Brief Periods Of Hard Exercise, Alternating With Rest, Burn Significant Amounts Of Calories

October 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
People who hate to exercise for long periods of time should be inspired by new research from Colorado scientists. In the study, five healthy men between 25 and 31 burned as many as 200 extra calories by vigorously exercising in five 30-second intervals, each followed by four minutes of rest. Analyzing results from a room calorimeter system, the researchers found that the volunteers burned an average of an extra 200 calories, despite spending just 2.5 minutes engaged in hard exercise. The researchers acknowledged that they did not know whether the routine would lead to weight loss. But they did suggest that intense, but brief, bursts of exercise could aid in weight maintenance.
Kyle Sevits et al., "A Single Session of Sprint Interval Training Increases Total Daily Energy Expenditure", News release, presentation at the Integrative Biology of Exercise VI meeting, October 10, 2012, © American Physiological Society
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Kretschmer Launches Web Site Promoting Health Benefits, Versatility Of Its Wheat Germ

October 9, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Wheat germ brand Kretschmer (Sun Country Foods) believes its “superfood” should play a bigger role in America’s breakfast, lunch and dinner plans. The brand has launched a Web site that provides wheat germ recipes and healthy lifestyle tips designed to upgrade wheat germ’s profile as a nutrition-packed and versatile meal ingredient. Wheat germ is derived from the most nutrient rich part of the wheat kernel and is an excellent – low-calorie – source of vitamin E, the B vitamins, folic acid, protein and fiber. MyWheatGerm.com suggests adding wheat germ to morning yogurt or cereal, a salad or smoothie at lunch, or using it as an alternative to bread crumbs at dinner time.
"Look Who's Coming To Dinner, Lunch And Breakfast: Wheat Germ Is One Of This Year's Rising Health Food Stars", News release, Kretschmer/Sun Country Foods, October 09, 2012, © Sun Country Foods
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Roquette Research Program To Develop Plant-Based Protein Alternatives To Animal, Soy Proteins

October 9, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
French biorefiner Roquette Freres has established a research program that will focus on developing plant-based proteins to meet the needs of a growing world population. Roquette has been processing plant-based raw materials for more than 75 years, but the new research program, dubbed Proteov, is a response to the fact that the global population is expected to reach nine billion by 2050. The Proteov research program will develop sustainable and affordable plant-derived protein sources that offer an alternative to animal proteins or soybeans. New Products will target general human and animal nutrition, sports, weight management and weight loss, and clinical and infant nutrition.
"Roquette commits itself to the development of a new generation of vegetable proteins", Press release, Roquette, October 09, 2012, © Roquette Freres
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Vitamin C Stimulates Bone Growth, Protects Against Osteoporosis – Study

October 9, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Chinese and American research team has found in an animal study that large doses of vitamin C can protect against the onset of osteoporosis. The study in female mice whose ovaries had been removed – the procedure reduces bone density –  showed that vitamin C actively stimulates bone formation by inducing premature bone cells (osteoblasts) to differentiate into mature specialty cells. The scientists suggested that further research could determine whether vitamin C supplements can prevent osteoporosis in humans, especially elderly women and men.
Ling-Ling Zhu et al., "Vitamin C Prevents Hypogonadal Bone Loss", PLoS ONE, October 09, 2012, © Zhu et al.
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