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<<29303132333435363738>> Total results:5062 References Per Page:

Daily Intake Of Walnuts Boosts Sperm Health

August 15, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Young men who eat 75 grams of walnuts – about two handfuls – a day improve the health of their sperm, a new U.S. study reports. The news offers hope to the 70 million or so couples who are experiencing subfertility or infertility worldwide. Thirty to 50 percent of the cases can be traced to the male partner. For the study, 117 healthy men between the ages of 21 and 35 either avoided eating tree nuts, or ate 75 grams of walnuts each day for 12 weeks. Tests of the sperm in both groups found that those who ate walnuts had improved sperm quality: greater vitality, motility, and morphology.
Robbins WA et al., "Walnuts improve semen quality in men consuming a Western-style diet: randomized control dietary intervention trial", Biology of Reproduction, August 15, 2012, © Biology of Reproduction
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New Technology Replaces Fats In Chocolate With Fruit Juice, Preserving Texture, Mouth-Feel

August 15, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
British researchers have figured out a way to replace as much as half of the cocoa butter and milk fats found in chocolate with micro-droplets of fruit juice – without loss of mouth-feel, texture or chocolaty taste. The new technology maintains the Polymorph V content of the chocolate, thus preserving the glossy appearance, firm texture and melt-in-your-mouth consistency. The chocolate – white, dark and milk chocolate – was infused with orange and cranberry juice using what is called the Pickering emulsion. The resulting confection has a fruity flavor that can be adjusted with water and ascorbic acid to bolster the chocolate taste.
Thomas S. Skelhon et al., "Quiescent Water-in-Oil Pickering Emulsions as a Route toward Healthier Fruit Juice Infused Chocolate Confectionary", Journal of Materials Chemistry, August 15, 2012, © Royal Society of Chemistry
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Mediterranean Diet Found To Boost Bone Formation In Older People

August 15, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Eating a Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil over a long period of time may have a protective effect on bones, an Italian study to be published in October finds. The study – it was originally designed to determine the diet’s impact on cardiovascular disease – included 127 men aged 55 to 80 years whose diet patterns were followed for two years. Researchers measured a variety of biomarkers, including cholesterol, triglycerides and osteocalcin, a bone formation marker. They found that only consumption of the Mediterranean diet with olive oil was associated with a significant increase in concentration of total osteocalcin and other bone formation markers.
José Manuel Fernández-Real et al., "A Mediterranean Diet Enriched with Olive Oil Is Associated with Higher Serum Total Osteocalcin Levels in Elderly Men at High Cardiovascular Risk", Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, August 15, 2012, © Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
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Italy

Yo-Yo Dieters Should Not Give Up On Healthy Diet, Physical Activity

August 14, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Constantly shedding and regaining pounds – a common phenomenon known as weight cycling or “yo-yo dieting” – does not adversely affect metabolism or reduce the ability to lose weight over the long term, a U.S. study has found. Researchers analyzed data from 439 overweight-to-obese  sedentary women, ages 50 to 75, who were assigned to diet-exercise plans or no plan at all. Eighteen percent were severe weight cyclers who had lost 20 or more pounds at least three times; 24 percent were moderate weight cyclers. Reason for optimism: all of the dieters-exercisers lost weight, and cyclers did not differ from the non-cyclers in the amount of weight loss.
Caitlin Mason et al., "History of weight cycling does not impede future weight loss or metabolic improvements in postmenopausal women", Metabolism, August 14, 2012, © Elsevier Inc.
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Cocoa Flavanol Intake Linked To Improvement Of Cognitive Impairment In Elderly

August 9, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
An Italian study of elderly people with mid cognitive impairment has found that daily intake of the  flavanols from cocoa significantly improved memory and cognitive scores, and reduced insulin resistance, blood pressure and oxidative stress. Flavanols are also found in tea, grapes, red wine, and apples, but for the study the source of the flavanols was restricted to cocoa. The researchers acknowledged that they weren’t sure whether the improvements in cognitive impairment were the direct result of the flavanols, or the indirect result of improvements in cardiovascular function.
Davide Grassi et al., "Protective Effects of Flavanol-Rich Dark Chocolate on Endothelial Function and Wave Reflection During Acute Hyperglycemia", Hypertension, August 09, 2012, © American Heart Association, Inc.
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Chinese Exercise Routine Improves Lives Of COPD Patients

August 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Australian researchers who worked with 42 people suffering from chronic obstructive respiratory disease (COPD) have found that Sun-style Tai Chi (SSTC), a smooth, flowing form of exercise, can improve exercise capacity and quality of life. The researchers also suggest that the exercise may be beneficial for pulmonary rehabilitation. For the study, half of the participants attended Tai Chi lessons twice a week and performed Tai Chi at home. The other half followed their usual medical management, which did not include exercise. The Tai Chi participants could walk significantly longer in a walking test, and also had higher scores on a COPD questionnaire,  indicating a better quality of life.
Regina Leung et al., "Short-form Sun-style Tai Chi as an exercise training modality in people with COPD", European Respiratory Journal, August 08, 2012, © European Respiratory Society
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An Assortment Of Veggies At Mealtime May Encourage Healthier Eating

August 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A four-week study by Penn State University researchers has found that participants offered a variety of vegetables ate more of them, even though they didn’t consume fewer total calories. The four different lunches during the study included various combinations of pasta with tomato sauce and broccoli, carrots or snap peas. Participants ate an average of 48 grams more vegetables when offered a variety. The researchers concluded that replacing salty, fatty foods in a person’s diet with a variety of vegetables may help increase the intake of healthy foods.
Jennifer S. Meengs et al., "Vegetable Variety: An Effective Strategy to Increase Vegetable Intake in Adults", Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, August 08, 2012, © Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
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Physical Fitness In Adolescents Associated With Sufficient Levels Of Iron, Vitamin C

August 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in Spain have found that the blood levels of various micronutrients such as iron and vitamin C in adolescents correlate with performance on physical fitness tests. Researchers analyzed nutrition and fitness data from a larger, long-term research project involving thousands of adolescents across Europe. The researchers found that for cardiorespiratory fitness, concentrations of hemoglobin, retinol, and vitamin C in males and beta-carotene and vitamin D in females was associated with maximum fitness. Concentrations of hemoglobin, beta-carotene, retinol, and alpha-tocopherol in males and beta-carotene and vitamin D in females were associated with better performance in the standing long jump.
L. Gracia-Marco et al., "Iron and vitamin status biomarkers and its association with physical fitness in adolescents", Journal of Applied Physiology, August 08, 2012, © Journal of Applied Physiology
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A Normal-Weight Young Person Who “Feels” Fat May Grow Up To Be Obese

August 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in Norway have determined from a long-term study of 1,196 normal-weight teenaged boys and girls that teens who perceive themselves as fat are more likely to grow up overweight or obese. The researcher suggested that one reason for this finding may be psychosocial stress that has been associated with gaining weight around the waist. The stress related to having (or not having) an ideal body type, along with thinking of oneself as fat, can result in weight gain. Another reason? Young people who see themselves as fat often change their eating habits by skipping meals. But dropping breakfast has been shown to lead to obesity.
Koenraad Cuypers et al., "Being Normal Weight but Feeling Overweight in Adolescence May Affect Weight Development into Young Adulthood", Journal of Obesity, August 08, 2012, © Koenraad Cuypers et al.
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Dietitian Recommends “Super-Food” Tofu

August 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A registered dietitian says substituting tofu for animal protein once a week is fairly risk-free and has many health benefits. For example, it helps lower overall cholesterol and so-called “bad” low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. As a soy product, tofu does have a down side: studies have linked intake of large amounts of soy to increased breast cancer risk. But in moderation, tofu is a “super-food” that has little saturated fat, zero cholesterol and lots of protein. Another benefit: it’s very versatile as a cooking ingredient and can be successfully added to any number of dishes.
Darlene Endy , "Tofu has little saturated fat, no cholesterol and is packed with protein", The Post-Standard (Syracuse, N.Y.), August 07, 2012, © Syracuse Online LLC
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Fasting, And Low-Calorie Diets Generally, Linked With Slower Aging Process

August 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A BBC report sheds some light on a scientific study that finds that the mostly out-of-favor “starvation diet” has some real benefits. BBC reporter Michael Mosley spoke with researchers at USC’s Longevity Institute, who say fasting reduces the levels of a growth factor (lGF-1) linked to disease development and aging. LGF-1 is needed during childhood, but not so much as a person ages. High levels later in life accelerate aging. But a low-calorie diet puts the brakes on lGF-1, slowing the aging process – at least in mice experiments.
Victoria Fletcher, "Warning: This article tells you a starvation diet could actually be good for you - and make you live longer", Daily Mail (U.K.), August 07, 2012, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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Normal-Weight Diabetics Die Earlier Than Those Overweight Or Obese

August 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Normal-weight participants in a U.S. study of new-onset (type 2) diabetes were more likely to die earlier than overweight or obese participants. Most research has focused on obese diabetics, because weight gain and obesity are significant risk factors for type 2 diabetes. But other factors play a role, including family history, ethnicity and age. Researchers looked at data from five studies involving 2,625 U.S. men and women over the age of 40 who had diabetes. They found that adults who were normal weight had higher total mortality and non-cardiovascular mortality than adults who were overweight or obese. The researchers speculated that genetics may be the key factor in the earlier deaths.
Mercedes R. Carnethon et al. , "Association of Weight Status With Mortality in Adults With Incident Diabetes", JAMA, August 07, 2012, © American Medical Association
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Babies Who Eat Healthy Foods Are Smarter By Age Eight Than Junk-Fed Peers

August 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
An Australian study of the dietary patterns of 7,000 infants and children up to eight years old found that those fed a healthy diet – e.g., legumes, cheese, fruit, vegetables – early in life had IQs at least two points higher at age eight than children fed junk food. Dietary patterns analyzed included home-prepared foods, ready-prepared baby foods, breastfeeding, and junk foods, such as cookies, chocolate, sweets, soft drinks and potato chips. "Diet supplies the nutrients needed for the development of brain tissues in the first two years of life,” researchers said.
Lisa G. Smithers et al., "Dietary patterns at 6, 15 and 24 months of age are associated with IQ at 8 years of age", European Journal of Epidemiology, August 07, 2012, © Springer
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Supplement Maker To Adapt New Delivery Technology To Its Products

August 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Fuse Science Inc. is licensing its “proprietary delivery technology” to Macular Health, LLC, which makes macular degeneration nutritional supplements. The deal marks the first time Fuse has licensed its technology in the health and nutrition field, and “product formulation work has already begun”. Fuse’s technology will be used to deliver medicines and other nutritional supplements in liquid drops rather than pills. Although there is no cure for macular degeneration, Macular Health says studies have shown that its supplements slow the effects of AMD and improve retina function by 16 percent within 12 to 16 weeks.
"Fuse Science Announces Landmark Licensing Agreement with Industry Leader Macular Health Fuse Technolo", News release, Fuse Science, August 06, 2012, © Fuse Science/Sacramento Bee
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Cut The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes With Weight Training, Aerobic Exercise

August 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Regular weight training can significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new Danish study. Researchers collected data on diet and exercise from 32,000 men from 1990 to 2008. Those who weight trained five times a week for 30 minutes were 34 percent less likely to have type 2 diabetes. When they combined weight training with 150 minutes of aerobic exercise a week, the risk of type 2 diabetes dropped by 59 percent. The researchers said diabetes risk is “likely to be mediated through increased muscle mass and improved insulin sensitivity."
Eric B. Rimm et al., "A Prospective Study of Weight Training and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in MenWeight Training and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes", Archives of Internal Medicine, August 06, 2012, © American Medical Association
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Research Uncovers Some Fun – And Healthy – Alternatives To Workouts, Dieting

August 5, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Realbuzz.com surveyed recent scientific research that offers some fun -- but healthy -- alternatives to strenuous workouts and strict dieting. One study, for example, finds that repeating “mirthful laughter” can improve mood, lower blood pressure, reduce bad cholesterol and strengthen the immune system – just like exercising. Another fun option is eating fiber-packed popcorn, which lowers cholesterol and contains B vitamins. An occasional popcorn snack is a healthy addition to the diet, “so long as you cut down on the sugar, salt and oils.”  Other fun alternatives include chocolate, sunshine and music.
"5 fun diet and fitness alternatives", realbuzz.com, August 05, 2012, © ABS-CBN Interactive/The Realbuzz Group Ltd.
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Funding Available For Research On Nutrition And Cognition

August 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers are encouraged to apply for a second wave of nutrition- and cognition-related research funding offered by Abbott Nutrition and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The funds – awarded through a collaborative effort known as the Center for Nutrition, Learning, and Memory – will support projects that focus on infants, pre-adolescent children, adults, the elderly, cancer patients and traumatic brain injury patients. According to Abbott, the research collaboration hopes to “uncover relationships between nutrition and cognition.”
Elaine Watson, "Abbott Nutrition invites second wave of research proposals on diet and cognition", NutraIngredients, August 04, 2012, © William Reed Business Media SAS
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Supplement Company Focuses on Healthy Eating – And Prescription-Only Supplements

August 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Diet Doc – a company that bills itself as a “wellness corporation, fitness facility, and sport supplement company” –  is touting a weight loss “ketogenic” diet that comprises green leafy vegetables, coconut oil (fat source), lean protein, fibrous plants and supplements. Nutritionists at the company tailor diet plans to patient needs, focusing on nutrient-rich greens like kale an spinach. A key to their diet plan is supplementation: fiber, probiotics and insulin and glucose support. Supplements are available only through prescriptions written by in-house doctors.
"HCG Diet Doc Reveals Weight Loss Diet Plan", Muncie Free Press, August 04, 2012, © kpaul media
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Healthy Heart And Lungs Linked To Better Performance On Math, Reading Tests

August 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
New U.S. research finds that middle-schoolers with healthy hearts and lungs are more likely to perform better on reading and math tests. Researchers looked at data gathered on 1,211 Texas middle school students, including whites, Mexican-Americans, Asian-Americans, African-Americans and American Indians. For boys and girls, cardiorespiratory fitness was the only factor related to their performance on the math tests. For girls, having a larger body mass index was the only factor other than cardiorespiratory fitness that predicted better reading scores.
Trent A. Petrie et al., "Physical Fitness and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Investigation", News release, presentation American Psychological Association's Annual Convention, August 04, 2012, © Petrie et al.
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Research Shows Chickpea Flour Could Replace Soy In Gluten-Free Breads

August 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Spanish researchers who tested the impact of four legume flours on gluten-free breads found that chickpea flour could be the best candidate for making gluten-free breads more palatable without using soy. The idea behind the experiments was to formulate a gluten-free bread where legume proteins were substituted for soy protein, which carries a risk of allergies. They tested chickpea flour, pea isolate, carob germ and soy flour, finding that chickpea bread could be a satisfactory alternative to soy protein. It has the best “physico-chemical characteristics,” “good  sensory behavior” and the “softest crumb”, the researchers found.
Nathan Gray, "Chickpea flour backed for gluten-free bread success", Bakery and Snacks, August 03, 2012, © William Reed Business Media
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Food Packages In Canada Must State In “Plain Language” Which Ingredients May Be Allergenic

August 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Canada has just implemented new food labeling regulations that require more detailed lists of ingredients – specifically potential allergens – on food packages. Manufacturers are now required to clearly state in “plain language” the presence of ingredients that could cause an allergic reaction. The 10 priority food allergens listed by Health Canada include peanuts, eggs, milk, tree nuts, wheat, soy, sesame seeds, seafood, sulfites and mustard. "The changes are an example of how collaboration between industry, government and stakeholders result in benefits for consumers," the industry organization Food and Consumer Products of Canada said in a statement.
Terry Pedwell, Winnipeg Free Press, August 03, 2012, © The Canadian Press
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Natural Therapies May Be Effective In Treating Chronic Fatigue

August 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) – an almost constant feeling of being stressed out and exhausted – affects more than a million Americans, and is most common among people aged 40 to 59. Believed to follow an infection or a period of high stress, the symptoms may last for years, are usually not relieved, even with bed rest, and can lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gastrointestinal distress, and depression of the immune system. Some natural and alternative therapies have been found effective in managing the condition: ginseng, kiwi fruit, omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils, and relaxation techniques, including meditation.
Catherine Ulbricht, Pharm.D., "Natural remedies can help fight chronic fatigue", Psychology Today, August 03, 2012, © Sussex Publishers, LLC
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Obesity Prevention Requires A Blend Of Strategies

August 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Though obesity is a growing problem among children in the U.S. – 17 percent are considered obese – many parents continue to pack their cupboards and refrigerators with junk food. And the food industry continues to supply it. But mental health professional Diane Girardot reports that obesity can be prevented. It takes a combination of strategies: individual lifestyle changes, environmental and governmental policy changes, tighter regulation of the food industry and possibly litigation. Unfortunately, however, many parents refuse to deprive their children of junk food. And many people believe that obesity is a personal choice and the government has no business regulating what and how much they eat and drink.
Diane Russell Girardot, "Behavior change and obesity in America", Philadelphia Inquirer, August 03, 2012, © Philadelphia Media Network Inc.
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Olympic Sports Are Good For The Body – And Especially For The Brain

August 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The physical benefits of Olympic sports are fairly obvious: they build strength, endurance and agility. But the Mayo Clinic reports that many of the sports TV viewers are watching in London this summer provide an aerobic workout that is also good for the brain, reducing the risk of dementia and cognitive impairment. Among the sports that are good not only for the body generally but also for the brain are: running, swimming, basketball, cycling, soccer, handball, race walking and tennis. Other Olympic brain boosters? Table tennis (ping pong), badminton, taekwondo, fencing, rowing and canoeing. 
"Olympics for the Rest of Us: How Ping-Pong Can Help Your Brain", News release, Mayo Clinic, August 03, 2012, © The Mayo Clinic
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Many People With Celiac Disease Remain Undiagnosed

August 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Mayo Clinic study, considered the most definitive to date, proves that celiac disease – a digestive disorder triggered by eating wheat, rye and barley – is “common” in the U.S. About 1.8 million Americans have it, though one in six remain undiagnosed. Meanwhile, about 1.6 million people have placed themselves on a gluten-free diet, though they have not been diagnosed, a fact that baffles physicians. "There are a lot of people on a gluten-free diet, and it's not clear what the medical need for that is," one researcher said.
Alberto Rubio-Tapia et al., "The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States", The American Journal of Gastroenterology, August 02, 2012, © The American College of Gastroenterology
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Is It Time To Revamp The System For Measuring Calories In Food?

July 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Pressure is mounting for an overhaul of the U.S. system for determining the absolute calories of foods, thanks to recent studies that call into question calorie counts shown on almond and pistachio packages. The studies challenge the Atwater general factor system for measuring calories, by asserting that the absolute calorie content listed on food packages does not gibe with the number of calories actually absorbed and metabolized by the body. Such an overhaul – which may also be attempted in the U.K. – would be time-consuming but not impossible, experts say.
Rod Addy, "Momentum builds to overhaul global calorie system", Food Navigator, July 31, 2012, © William Reed Business Media
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Pregnant Women Exposed To Electromagnetic Fields More Likely To Have Obese Children

July 27, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A long-term U.S. study of the effects of high electromagnetic fields (EMF) on pregnant women and their unborn children has found a 69 percent increase in the risk of offspring being overweight or obese during childhood. For the study, pregnant women carried a meter that measured exposure to magnetic fields. Researchers followed 733 children for up to 13 years. The study found a dose response relationship: increasing in-utero magnetic field levels were linked to increase risk of obesity. The researchers suggested that "EMF exposure during pregnancy could impact the fetal development, including endocrine and metabolic systems, predisposing offspring to higher risk of obesity."
De-Kun Li et al., "A Prospective Study of In-utero Exposure to Magnetic Fields and the Risk of Childhood Obesity", Nature: Scientific Reports, July 27, 2012, © Nature Publishing Group
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Study Of Modern Hunter-Gatherers Upends Theories About Global Obesity Problem

July 26, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
There is no difference in energy expenditure among modern hunter-gatherers and Westerners, according to new U.S. research that suggests eating too much, not exercising too little, might be the big problem. Scientists studied the Hadza of the savannah regions of northern Tanzania, who spend their days hunting and foraging for wild plants. Taking precise measurements and accounting for effects of body weight, etc., they found that the Hadza burned no more calories in a day than the average adult in the U.S. and Europe. The findings seem to indicate that the rise in obesity is due to increased food consumption, not decreased energy expenditure.
Herman Pontzer et al., "Hunter-Gatherer Energetics and Human Obesity", PLoS ONE, July 26, 2012, © Pontzer et al.
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Excess Iodine Ingestion During Pregnancy Can Be Harmful To Children

July 26, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Expectant mothers who take more than the recommended daily dose of iodine put their unborn children at risk of developing congenital hypothyroidism, according to a U.S. study. If left untreated, congenital hypothyroidism – or thyroid hormone deficiency – can cause neuro-cognitive impairments in infants and children. The recommended daily intake of iodine for expectant mothers is 200 – 300 micrograms (µg). But in three cases of infant hypothyroidism the researchers examined, the mothers had ingested 12.5 mg of iodine daily, or 11 times more than the safe upper limit of 1,100 µg. Sources of iodine include nutritional supplements, prenatal vitamins and seaweed.
Kara J. Connelly et al., "Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by Excess Prenatal Maternal Iodine Ingestion", The Journal of Pediatrics, July 26, 2012, © Elsevier B.V.
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Biologists Figure Out Why The E. Coli Outbreak In Germany In 2011 Was So Deadly

July 26, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. epidemiologists have determined that the E. coli outbreak that occurred in Germany in 2011 – the deadliest ever recorded, causing 54 deaths and 3,800 illnesses – was caused by a particular strain of the bacteria.  Although the researchers weren’t able to determine how the strain – E. coli O104:H4 – causes disease, they did find that the strain’s biofilm, a group of bacteria that collects on a cell, is the reason the strain was so deadly. When the bacteria forms a biofilm, it generates toxic genes, like the Shiga toxin that was the main reason for kidney damage and deaths in Germany.
Rim Al Safadi et al., "Correlation between In Vivo Biofilm Formation and Virulence Gene Expression in Escherichia coli O104:H4", PLoS ONE, July 26, 2012, © Safadi et al.
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Low Vitamin D Levels Among The Elderly Frail Can Be Deadly

July 26, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists have known for some time that frailty and vitamin D deficiency separately had harmful health effects on the elderly. But new U.S. research among 4,300 over-60 adults finds that low vitamin D levels increased the risk of death, especially among those already in delicate health. The researchers recommend that older adults be screened for vitamin D, and should maintain healthy levels of vitamin D by consuming fish and milk, and by getting more exercise in the sunshine.
E Smit et al., "The effect of vitamin D and frailty on mortality among non-institutionalized US older adults", European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, July 26, 2012, © Nature Publishing Group
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Low-Protein Diet Among Pregnant Women Predisposes Offspring To Adult Hypertension

July 25, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers report that the offspring of pregnant women who eat a low-protein diet are more prone to high blood pressure in adulthood because of the failure of an enzyme that moderates the hormone testosterone. In a study in rats, the researchers found that high maternal testosterone levels – associated with a low-protein diet – are caused by the activity of an enzyme that normally deactivates testosterone. When that enzyme, known as Hsd17b2, isn’t working properly, more testosterone reaches the fetus, boosting susceptibility to adult hypertension. The enzyme ordinarily converts testosterone to the less potent androgen, androstenedione.
Haijun Gao et al., "estational Protein Restriction Reduces Expression of Hsd17b2 in Rat Placental Labyrinth", Biology of Reproduction, July 25, 2012, © The Society for the Study of Reproduction
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Subconscious “Stop Signs” Curtail Consumption Of Potato Chips In Tubes

July 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers at Cornell University have found that placing edible serving-size markers in tubes of potato chips can help curb overeating. The researchers conducted an experiment in which 96 students divided into two groups were served potato chips in tubes while watching videos in class. Some of the tubes contained chips dyed red. The students who were served tubes with chips dyed red ate 50 percent less than their peers. The researchers concluded that the red chips acted as unconscious “stop signs” that cut the number of chips consumed. 
Geier et al., "Red potato chips: Segmentation cues can substantially decrease food intake", Health Psychology, July 24, 2012, © American Psychological Association
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Childhood Obesity Linked To High Risk Of Adult Cancers

July 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Israeli researchers have discovered a link between adolescent obesity and bladder, urinary tract and colorectal cancers in adulthood. This threat can now be added to the growing list of dangers associated with adolescent obesity, including diabetes, heart disease and joint and muscle pain. Obese children – above the 84th percentile in body mass index – have a 1.42 percent greater chance – a 50 percent higher risk – of adult cancers. The study analyzed data from a longitudinal study of 1.1 million men in the Israeli Defense Forces.
Z. Levi et al., "Measured Body Mass Index in Adolescence and the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in a Cohort of 1.1 Million Males", Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, July 24, 2012, © American Association for Cancer Research
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Beware Of Foods Marketed As “Healthy” – Including Some Veggies

July 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Some vegetables and other foods normally considered or marketed as “healthy” – compared to junk foods high in fat, sugar or salt – may actually be detrimental if excessive amounts are eaten, according to a U.S. university dietitian. Worrisome foods include those claimed to be healthy – e.g., “low fat” or “fat free” foods – that may be high in sugar or calories. Vegetables that should be eaten in moderation because they are high in starch include peas, corn and potatoes.
Brooke Schantz, "Is There Such a Thing as Eating Too Many Fruits and Vegetables?", News release, Loyola University Health System, July 24, 2012, © Loyola University Health System
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Significant Proportion Of Obese Children Show Signs Of Cardiovascular Disease

July 24, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study based on data provided by Dutch pediatricians over three years finds that 67 percent of children with a body mass index associated with obesity had at least one symptom of cardiovascular disease. Fifty-six percent had high blood pressure; 54 percent had high levels of low density “bad” cholesterol; 14 percent had high fasting blood glucose; and one percent already had type 2 diabetes. The authors concluded that there is an urgent need for internationally accepted criteria for defining severe obesity as well as “guidelines for early detection and treatment of severe obesity and [underlying ill health].”
Nathalie M A van Emmerik et al., "High cardiovascular risk in severely obese young children and adolescents", Archives of Disease in Childhood, July 24, 2012, © Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health
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Intake Of Vitamins C And E, And Selenium, Linked To Reduced Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer

July 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A long-term British study involving 23,500 middle-aged and elderly people finds that the risk of pancreatic cancer may be reduced significantly by increasing consumption of antioxidant vitamins C and E and the chemical element selenium. Pancreatic cancer kills about 250,000 people around the world each year. Only three percent of those diagnosed with the disease survive to five years. A weekly intake of selenium in the top 25 percent of consumption cut the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in half. Those whose vitamins C, E, and selenium intake was in the top 25 percent of consumption were 67 percent less likely to develop pancreatic cancer.
Paul J R Banim et al., "Dietary antioxidants and the etiology of pancreatic cancer: a cohort study using data from food diaries and biomarkers", Gut, July 23, 2012, © British Society of Gastroenterology
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Preseason Fitness Less Important Than Sex, Type Of College Sport, To Injury Rate

July 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Canadian study finds that being physically fit before a college sports season begins does not reduce the risk of injury. Instead, the key factors are the sex of the participants and the type of sport played. Women incurred their first injury on average about 40 percent of the way through the season; men incurred their first injury 66 percent through the season. Injuries occurred among women in volleyball much faster – 20 percent into the season, 35 percent for men – than in other sports. Surprisingly, injuries in men’s hockey occurred on average three quarters of the way through the season, making it the safest sport.
Michael D Kennedy et al., "Can pre-season fitness measures predict time to injury in varsity athletes?", Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, July 23, 2012, © BioMed Central Ltd
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Vitamin D Seems To Lessen Lung Damage Among Long-Term Smokers

July 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A 20-year U.S. study of 626 elderly white men found that vitamin D deficiency was closely associated with faster – and more severe – decline in lung function among smokers. Vitamin D levels were checked three times between 1984 and 2003. The researchers found no significant effect of vitamin D levels on lung function or lung function decline in the overall study population, which included both smokers and non-smokers. But they found that vitamin D seems to protect the lungs of smokers, probably because of "vitamin D's anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties."
Nancy E. Lange et al., "Vitamin D deficiency, Smoking, and Lung Function in the Normative Aging Study", American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, July 22, 2012, © American Thoracic Society
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Sugar-Sweetened Sodas, Fruit Drinks Not Tied To Drop In Milk Consumption Among Kids

July 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Although children in the U.S. are drinking less milk these days, a new study finds the drop in consumption is not related to the steep increase in drinking low-nutrition sugary drinks. Milk drinking dropped between 5th and 8th grade, according to researchers who studied the long-term dietary habits of 7,445 students who were kindergartners in a 1998 -1999. Among the same group, consumption of sugary sodas and flavored fruit drinks doubled. But the researchers noted that changes in children's milk and 100-percent-juice consumption were not significantly related to changes in their consumption of sweetened beverages over time. The conclusion? Sweetened beverages did not replace other caloric beverages in children's diets.
Reena Oza-Frank et al., "Beverage Displacement between Elementary and Middle School, 2004-2007", Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, July 22, 2012, © Elsevier B.V.
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Move Over Broccoli: Australian Bakery Unveils Low-GI “Super Bread”

July 20, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The glycemic index (GI) of bread can range from 54 to 87, depending on the type. But a bakery in Queensland, Australia, says it has developed a dense bread whose GI is about the same as broccoli (17), contains seven percent carbohydrates, 26 percent protein – about the same as red meat – and more fat, though from natural seeds. The owners of Ashmore Bakery Club say they developed the bread to “give health-conscious customers an alternative.” A final benefit? “We are extremely happy with the product and its taste,'' one of the owners said, adding that the new formula would “change the baking industry.”
Jessica Elder, "Coast bakery launches low-carb bread", Goldcoast.com.au, July 20, 2012, © News Limited
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Sedentary Lifestyle Is Wreaking Havoc On Global Health – Study

July 20, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Lack of physical activity is a major problem – a “global pandemic” – that is not getting the attention it deserves, according to U.S. researchers. Physical inactivity has costly consequences, because it leads to increased weight and the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes. One-third of people 15 and over were insufficiently active in 2008; about 3.2 million deaths a year can be traced to insufficient physical activity, according to the World Health Organization. The researchers urge making physical activity a priority issue in health, transportation, sports, education and business.
Harold W Kohl et al., "The pandemic of physical inactivity: global action for public health", The Lancet, July 20, 2012, © Elsevier Limited
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RDA Of Vitamin C Could Be Doubled Safely For Optimum Health Benefit

July 18, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Medical experts who determine the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin C are using inappropriate evaluation techniques to come up with faulty conclusions, according to a U.S. review of recent scientific literature. Specifically, the researchers found, the RDA of vitamin C could be doubled – to an optimum 200 mg a day, instead of 75 to 90 mg – to safely saturate cells and tissues for the greatest possible health benefit, they said. The problem is that medical experts insist on evaluating vitamin C in the same way they do pharmaceutical drugs, using phase 3 randomized placebo-controlled trials. This “almost insures they will find no beneficial effect,” the researchers said. “We need to get past that.”
Balz Frei et al., "Authors' Perspective: What is the Optimum Intake of Vitamin C in Humans?", Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, July 18, 2012, © Informa plc
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Study Shows Too Much TV Time Is Bad For A Child’s Waistline

July 18, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Every hour a preschooler sits glued to the TV means a greater likelihood of a larger waist size by the end of grade four, Canadian researchers have found. Participants in a Quebec-based study included 1,314 children and their parents. The researchers found that a child’s waist size at age 4.5 years increased by slightly less than half a millimeter for every extra weekly hour of TV watched in addition to what they had been watching when they were 2.5 years old. A child who watches 18 hours of television at 4.5 years of age will by age 10 have an extra 7.6 millimeters of waist.
Caroline Fitzpatrick et al., "Early childhood television viewing predicts explosive leg strength and waist circumference by middle childhood", International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, July 18, 2012, © BioMed Central Ltd
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Reducing Obesity In Canada Would Help Relieve The Strain On The National Health System

July 18, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Canadian economist who studied the relationship between obesity and the number of doctor visits found that if obesity – and related complications, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease – were eliminated, doctor visits would drop by more than ten percent. That, in turn, would relieve some of the stress on the already overburdened national health system. The economist analyzed data on 60,000 Canadians from a national health survey. He suggested that reducing obesity might be achieved through economic incentives (such as higher health insurance premiums) and through tighter regulation of the fast food industry.
James McIntosh, "Weight Loss Today Keeps the Doctor Away", News release, unpublished research by James McIntosh, July 18, 2012, © Concordia University
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U.K. Pastry Shop Says Its Italian Cake Bars Boost The Metabolic Rate

July 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A London-based start-up patisserie claims that its Italian pastries – in the form of cake bars –  contain a blend of natural ingredients that encourage the body to burn calories. The line of nine bars in a variety of flavors contain L-carnitine, guarana and green tea, all of which purportedly boost the body’s metabolic rate. Each bar also packs between 110 and 150 calories, but the bakery doesn’t say whether the calories burned equals the calories consumed. The founder of Klever Kalories says it hopes to expand its product line to cupcakes and savory snacks, such as crisps (AKA potato chips).
Lisa Riley, "The Klever cakes that claim to burn calories", The Grocer, July 17, 2012, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
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Cut Salt And Sugar In Bread Recipes By Using Novel “Layering” Technique

July 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Dutch scientists have found that bakers can add up to 25 percent less salt or sugar to bread recipes without loss of flavor by introducing the ingredients in layers or stripes. The technique intensifies the flavor, despite the smaller amounts of salt or sugar. The researchers say the key is the contrast between very salty and less salty (or very sweet and less sweet) areas: it causes the taste to register more intensely in the brain. The technique might be accomplished, for example, by making a loaf of bread with a mix of a saltier dough with a less salty dough. Overall, less salt is used though the flavor is just as satisfying, and healthier.
Pat Hagan, "Could using LESS salt be bad for your health", Daily Mail, July 17, 2012, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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Diabetes Risk Rises Dramatically When Obesity Is Combined With Vitamin D Deficiency

July 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Research has shown that vitamin D insufficiency and obesity are individual risk factors for insulin resistance and diabetes. But new U.S. research shows that when you combine the two, the odds of insulin resistance rise to an even greater degree. Obese individuals in the study who had healthy levels of vitamin D were 20 times more likely to have insulin resistance than the overall study population. But obese individuals who also had low levels of vitamin D were 32 times more likely to have insulin resistance. Further research could help determine whether vitamin D supplements would reduce insulin resistance.
S. M. Kabadi et al., "Joint Effects of Obesity and Vitamin D Insufficiency on Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes", Diabetes Care, July 17, 2012, © American Diabetes Association
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Chinese Study Finds That Dietary And Supplemental Vitamin E Reduces Risk Of Liver Cancer

July 17, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
An analysis of health data from nearly 133,000 middle-aged and older Chinese men and women found that vitamin E intake from both diet and supplements were associated with a lower risk of liver cancer, the third most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. The association was consistent among participants with and without self-reported liver disease or a family history of liver cancer. "We found a clear, inverse dose-response relation between vitamin E intake and liver cancer risk," the authors wrote. Nuts, seeds, and vegetable oils are among the best natural sources of vitamin E.
Wei Zhang et al., "Vitamin Intake and Liver Cancer Risk: A Report From Two Cohort Studies in China", Journal of the National Cancer Institute, July 17, 2012, © The Authors
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Chemicals Found In Personal Care Products Are Linked To Greater Risk Of Diabetes

July 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Chemicals known as phthalates – commonly found in personal care products such as moisturizers, nail polishes, soaps, hair sprays and perfumes – have been linked to an increased risk of diabetes in women. U.S. researchers who analyzed urinary concentrations of phthalates in 2,350 women found that those with higher concentrations in their blood were more likely to have diabetes. Specifically, women with moderately high levels of mono-n-butyl phthalate and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate were 70 percent more likely to have diabetes. However, researchers acknowledged that phthalates are also present in certain medical devices and medications used to treat diabetes.
Tamarra James-Todd et al., "Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Diabetes among Women", Environmental Health Perspectives, July 13, 2012, © Tamarra James-Todd et al.
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