We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<31323334353637383940>> Total results:5062 References Per Page:

Older Women Do Not Escape Eating Disorders Associated With Teenagers, Young Adults

June 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study of older women – average age 59 – finds that aging does not prevent or ward off eating disorders. Among women over 50, 3.5 percent report binge eating, eight percent report purging, and more than 70 percent are trying to lose weight. Sixty-two percent of women said their weight or shape negatively affected their life. More than a quarter of the participants – 92 percent of whom were white – were obese, 29 percent were overweight, 42 percent were normal weight and two percent were underweight. The researchers urged healthcare providers to “remain alert for eating disorder symptoms and weight and shape concerns” that could harm the physical and psychological wellbeing of aging women.
Danielle A. Gagne et al., "Eating disorder symptoms and weight and shape concerns in a large web-based convenience sample of women ages 50 and above", International Journal of Eating Disorders, June 21, 2012, © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Women's Health
Other Women's Health
Aging
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

“Neglectful” Parents Contribute To Sedentary Lives Of Young Children

June 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Young children who spend too much time watching TV or playing video games – and too little time getting exercise – are more likely to have parents who either aren’t around, are less involved, or just too permissive, a U.S. study finds. Parenting style, in other words, plays a major role in whether children are inactive. All the children in the study sample of about 200 families were sitting four to five hours in a typical day. But parents in the more “neglectful” category had children who were spending up to 30 additional minutes a day watching television, playing a video game or being engaged in some other form of "screen time."
David P. Schary et al., "Parenting style associated with sedentary behavior in preschool children", Early Child Development and Care, June 21, 2012, © Informa plc
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Kid's Health
Pre-School/School
Fitness & Exercise
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

A Contrarian View Of The Health Impact Of Fructose: It Helps Control Blood Sugar In Diabetics

June 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientific evidence of the dangers of fructose consumption continues to pile up, but new research takes a contrarian view that should cheer up the sugar industry. A Canadian review of 18 clinical trials involving 209 participants with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes found that fructose significantly improved blood sugar control. The improvement was similar to that achieved by an oral anti-diabetes drug. Moreover, the improvement came without adverse impact on body weight, blood pressure, uric acid (gout) or cholesterol. Participants in the trials were fed diets in which fructose was incorporated or sprinkled on foods such as cereals or coffee.
Adrian I. Cozma et al., "Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A systematic review", Diabetes Care, June 21, 2012, © American Diabetes Association
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Diabetes Contributes Significantly To Accelerated Cognitive Decline Among The Elderly

June 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A nine-year U.S. study of the link between diabetes and cognitive decline shows that older people with diabetes, or who develop diabetes later in life, are at a much greater risk of cognitive decline. The study of 3,069 adults over age 70 – hundreds of whom had diabetes at the start of the research – found that people who had diabetes at the start declined cognitively faster than those who developed diabetes later. And those who developed diabetes during the study declined cognitively faster than those who did not develop diabetes at all. "Both the duration and the severity of diabetes are very important factors" in accelerated cognitive aging, researchers noted.
Kristine Yaffe et al., "Diabetes, Glucose Control, and 9-Year Cognitive Decline Among Non-Demented Older Adults Without Dementia", Archives of Neurology, June 21, 2012, © American Medical Association
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Kid's Health
Mind
Pre-School/School
Mental Alertness
Aging
Brain
Fitness & Exercise
Diabetes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Add Tai Chi To The Growing List Of Elder Activities That May Stave Off Dementia

June 20, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
An eight-month randomized clinical trial comparing Chinese seniors aged 60 to 70 who practiced Tai Chi and involved themselves in spirited discussions several times a week found increases in brain volume and improvements on tests and memory. The positive results were not found among a non-Tai Chi group. The study by U.S. and Chinese researchers also found that seniors who did not participate in Tai Chi showed brain shrinkage – an indicator of the onset of dementia – typical of their age group. The researchers concluded that “it may be possible to delay the onset of dementia in older persons through interventions that have many physical and mental health benefits."
James A. Mortimer et al., "Changes in Brain Volume and Cognition in a Randomized Trial of Exercise and Social Interaction in a Community-Based Sample of Non-Demented Chinese Elders", Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, June 20, 2012, © IOS Press
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Aging
Brain
Fitness & Exercise
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
China

Strict Control Of Glucose Levels In Diabetics Prevents Neuropathy – But With Serious Side Effects

June 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Half of diabetics develop a disabling condition known as diabetic neuropathy, which leaves feet and legs feeling tingly, numb, painful or weak. Neuropathy can be prevented by strict control of blood sugar levels. But a U.S. and British review of six clinical studies of enhanced glucose control methods – extra insulin injections, anti-diabetic drugs, and diet changes – has found that they can be effective, there is a significant risk of adverse effects, including hypoglycemia. Further research is needed to find optimum target levels for safe treatments that will both prevent neuropathy and minimize serious side effects, according to the scientists who conducted the review.
Brian C Callaghan et al., "Enhanced glucose control for preventing and treating diabetic neuropathy", Cochrane Review, June 13, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Fish Oil Supplements Do Not Prevent Cognitive Decline In Older People

June 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A systematic review of three British short-term clinical trials involving more than 3,500 people aged 60 or over has found that omega-3 fish oil supplements probably do not help older people retain cognitive function. The researchers acknowledged that the studies were relatively short, so the longer term effects of omega-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline and dementia need to be further explored. The trials, which were conducted for up to four years, compared the effects of omega-3 fatty acids taken in capsules or margarine to the effects of sunflower oil, olive oil or regular margarine (placebos). Participants given omega-3s did not score better in mental state examinations, or in memory and verbal fluency tests.
Emma Sydenham et al., ". Omega 3 fatty acid for the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia", The Cochrane Library, June 13, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Mind
Mental Alertness
Aging
Brain
Pills & Supplements
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Excessive Sleepiness, Depression, Linked To Obesity

June 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Three studies presented at a recent scientific conference show that obesity and depression are crucial factors in excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. A lack of sleep, especially when combined with obstructive sleep apnea, have been linked with cardiovascular disorders, depression, diabetes and even accidents. According to the researchers, "Weight loss, depression and sleep disorders should be our priorities in terms of preventing the medical complications and public safety hazards associated with excessive sleepiness."
Alexandros Vgontzas et al., "Obesity, Depression Found to Be Root Causes of Daytime Sleepiness", News release, presentation at Sleep 2012, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, June 13, 2012, © American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Mind
Depression
Sleep & Relaxation
Stress Management
Dieting & Weight Control
Heart & Cardiovascular
Diabetes
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Fifty-Year-Old Chemotherapy Drug May Find New Life As ALS Treatment

June 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists in Italy may have found an effective new use for a 1960s-era anti-cancer chemotherapy drug: as a treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig’s disease, a fatal nerve disorder. They showed that the drug cisplatin prevents clumping of the antioxidant enzyme hSOD1, which has been linked to ALS. Cisplatin binds readily to the enzyme, preventing it from clumping, while dissolving existing clumps. The enzyme does not, however, prevent the enzyme from performing normal functions. "From this work it appears that cisplatin is a promising lead compound for the rational design of ALS treatments," the authors wrote.
Lucia Banci et al., "Interaction of Cisplatin with Human Superoxide Dismutase", Journal of the American Chemical Society, June 13, 2012, © American Chemical Society
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Brain
Other Conditions
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Italy

Scientists Discover Brain Hormone That Acts As Exercise Motivator

June 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Swiss researchers have found in a mouse study that when the brain hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is elevated, the mice were motivated to exercise more without increasing red blood cell counts. The findings suggest that a treatment based on Epo might offer benefits for a range of health problems, including Alzheimer’s, obesity, and mental health disorders where increased physical activity might improve symptoms. According to the researchers, Epo seems to positively affect mood and might be used in patients suffering from depression and related diseases.
B. Schuler et al., "Acute and chronic elevation of erythropoietin in the brain improves exercise performance in mice without inducing erythropoiesis", The FASEB Journal, June 13, 2012, © Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Mind
Depression
Happiness & Contentment
Alternative Therapies
Brain
Fitness & Exercise
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Switzerland

Fear Of The Dark May Be Significant Cause Of Sleep Disorders

June 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Canadian researchers have found that fear of the dark may be a major cause of insomnia.  The study of Toronto college students suggests that, given this finding, treatment of insomnia may require some new approaches. Researchers measured blink responses of study participants to sudden noise bursts in light and dark surroundings. Good sleepers became accustomed to the bursts, but poor sleepers became tense and anticipated the bursts when the lights were turned off. Nearly half of the students in the study who reported sleep problems said they were afraid of the dark.
Taryn Moss et al., "Are people with insomnia afraid of the dark? A pilot study", Presentation, annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 11, 2012, © Associated Professional Sleep Societies
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Mind
Sleep & Relaxation
Brain
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Battle Over Sugary Diets Drags On

June 11, 2012: 10:07 AM EST
Nutritionists, the sugar industry and governments remain locked in a battle for the hearts, minds and wallets of Americans. According to an American Heart Association spokesman, U.S. adults on average consume 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day. That contributes mightily to obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and makes it a public health policy issue. But sugar industry representatives, like the Corn Refiners Association and the Sugar Association, say sugars have been "unfairly demonized." America’s obesity problem is "much more complicated," they argue. Agreed, some nutrition experts say: sugar itself is not evil. The critical health problem arises when sugar is consumed in super-size quantities every day.
Nanci Hellmich, "Nutrition advocates turning sour on sugar", USA TODAY, June 11, 2012, © USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Stroke Risk Is Greatest For Older, Normal-Weight Adults Who Sleep Six Hours Or Less A Night

June 11, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Middle-aged and older adults who routinely get less than six hours of sleep a night are at greater risk of stroke, a three-year U.S. study of 5,666 normal-weight people has found. At the start of the study, participants had no history of stroke or symptoms of stroke. But over time, short sleep duration proved to be a precursor of other traditional stroke risk factors. Once those factors are present, “ they become stronger risk factors than sleep duration alone,” researchers concluded. Curiously, the study found no link between short sleep periods and stroke symptoms among overweight and obese participants.
Megan Ruiter et al., "Short sleep predicts stroke symptoms in persons of normal weight", Presentation, annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 11, 2012, © Associated Professional Sleep Societies
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Mind
Sleep & Relaxation
Brain
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Conditions
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Brain Imaging Research Shows Why Sleep-Deprived Individuals Crave Junk Foods

June 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sheds light on why sleep-restricted individuals find unhealthy foods more attractive and rewarding. fMRI of the brains of 25 normal-weight men and women showed that the sight of unhealthy food during a period of sleep restriction activated reward centers in the brain that were less active when participants had adequate sleep. Researchers said food intake data from the study showed that participants ate more overall and consumed more fat after a period of sleep restriction compared to regular sleep. “The brain imaging data provided the neurocognitive basis for those results," they said.
Marie-Pierre St-Onge et al., "Sleep restriction increases the neuronal response to unhealthy food stimuli", Presentation, annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 10, 2012, © Associated Professional Sleep Societies
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Brain
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

High-Fat/Low-Carb Diets Increase Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

June 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Swedish study has found that low carbohydrate/high fat diets help short term weight loss, but the loss is not maintained over the long term. In fact, the diet increases blood cholesterol, which has a major impact on risk of cardiovascular disease. The study looked at 25 years of data from a regional and national dietary intervention to reduce fat intake. The intervention decreased cholesterol levels. The program then switched to a popular high fat/low carbohydrate diet that, in turn,  raised cholesterol levels. Body mass index (BMI) increased over the 25 years, regardless of either diet; both the increase in BMI and cholesterol levels increased cardiovascular risk.
Ingegerd Johansson et al., "Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden", Nutrition Journal, June 10, 2012, © BioMed Central Ltd
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Low-Carb
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Sweden

Study Shows That Sleep Deprivation Impairs Brain’s Ability To Select Healthy Foods

June 10, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Lack of sleep damages the areas of the brain where decisions are made about eating healthy or unhealthy foods, a University of California researcher reports. Graduate student Stephanie Greer says her findings may explain the connection between sleep deprivation and obesity. For the study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the brains of 23 healthy adults after a normal night’s sleep and a night of sleep deprivation. Scan results showed that sleep deprivation significantly impaired brain activity in the frontal lobe, a region critical for controlling behavior and making complex choices, such as the selection of food to eat.
Stephanie Greer, "Sleep deprivation disrupts human brain reactivity in response to food desire", Presentation, annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 10, 2012, © Associated Professional Sleep Societies
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Mind
Sleep & Relaxation
Brain
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hypertensive Teens At Risk For Cardiovascular Disease Benefit From Meditation

June 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study of 62 African-American teenagers with high blood pressure has found that regular meditation decreases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease among at-risk teens. Half of the teens were trained in transcendental meditation. They then meditated for 15 minutes with a class and 15 minutes at home each day for four months. The other half were taught ways to lower blood pressure and risk for cardiovascular disease, but did no meditation. Participants who meditated twice a day for 15 minutes had lower left ventricular mass – an indicator of future cardiovascular disease – than the control group. 
Vernon A. Barnes et al., "Impact of Transcendental Meditation on Left Ventricular Mass in African American Adolescents", Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 07, 2012, © Vernon A. Barnes et al.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Kid's Health
Mind
Teen
Stress Management
Alternative Therapies
Heart & Cardiovascular
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Modifying The Gut “Microbiome” May Have Therapeutic Benefits

June 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who analyzed the role of gut microbes in nutrient absorption and energy regulation find that there may be significant health benefits when the composition of microbial communities is modified. Microorganisms in the gut vary with age, body weight and variety of food ingested. They also change after bariatric surgery for obesity and with the ingestion of antibiotics. The authors suggest that therapeutic modification of the gut “microbiome” may provide a way to treat nutrition-related maladies, including obesity and the serious health consequences linked to under-nutrition.
R. Krajmalnik-Brown et al., "Effects of Gut Microbes on Nutrient Absorption and Energy Regulation", Nutrition in Clinical Practice, June 06, 2012, © American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Digestive
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

New Technology Makes It Easy To Test For Celiac Disease

June 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists in Europe say they have developed a quick, effective and cheap “lab-on-a-chip” method to test for gluten intolerance, the main characteristic of celiac disease. Gluten is a protein found in wheat flour. The diagnostic and monitoring system will soon be tested in clinical trials in Slovenia and could be available to doctors, hospitals and clinics in Europe and elsewhere within a few years. The system is the result of a convergence of innovative technologies such as microfluidics, nanotechnology and genetic testing. The researchers say the technology can be adapted for use in other autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis, thyroiditis, and even cancer.
Ciara O'Sullivan, "A Quick, Cheap, Accurate Test for Gluten Intolerance", News release, CD-Medics project, June 06, 2012, © CORDIS
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Digestive
Other Food & Nutrition
Asthma & Allergies
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Germany
Spain
Slovenia

Pilot Project Shows That Teens Can Reduce Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

June 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers focusing on the health and dietary patterns of people in Appalachia developed a pilot interventional program that significantly reduced consumption of sugar sweetened beverages among teenagers. High concentrations of chronic diabetes and obesity are found among the 25 million people of Appalachia – a region that stretches from the southern tier of New York to northern Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia. The pilot program used surveys, focus groups and community health advocates to create a “Sodabriety” challenge for teens: give up or reduce consumption of sugary drinks for 30 days. According to the researchers, the project worked because teens “motivated each other in ways that showed a sense of ownership and pride."
Smith, Laureen H. et al., "Engaging Rural and Urban Appalachians in Research using a Community-Based Participatory Research Approach", PRISM: A Journal of Regional Engagement, June 06, 2012, © The Authors
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Kid's Health
Teen
Dieting & Weight Control
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Eating Fruits And Vegetables Seems To Help Smokers Kick The Habit

June 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A 14-month U.S. study based on interviews with 1,000 smokers aged 25 and older found that those who quit smoking tended to consume more fruits and vegetables. Smokers who consumed the most fruit and vegetables were three times more likely to be tobacco-free for at least 30 days at follow-up 14 months later than those consuming the lowest amount of fruits and vegetables. The held true even when adjustments were made to take into account age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, household income and health orientation. Though the researchers acknowledged that their findings from telephone interviews were “observational” only, they said they "may have identified a new tool that can help people quit smoking."
J. P. Haibach et al., "A Longitudinal Evaluation of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Cigarette Smoking", Nicotine & Tobacco Research, June 06, 2012, © The Author
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Cancer & Cancer Prevention
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Most Purportedly Natural Grapefruit Seed Extracts Are Adulterated With Antimicrobials

June 5, 2012: 08:01 PM EST
Grapefruit seed extracts have been marketed for three decades as natural antimicrobial treatments – used both topically and internally – for eczema, acne, cold sores, athlete’s foot, sore throats, etc. But the nonprofit American Botanical Council has published a review of recent scientific literature that finds most products that contain grapefruit seed extracts are adulterated  with synthetic additives, including the antimicrobials benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, triclosan, and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate. The researcher who wrote the review concluded that most of the products on the market are “adulterated, and any observed antimicrobial activity is due to synthetic additives, not the grapefruit seed extract itself.
John H. Cardellina, "The Adulteration of Commercial “Grapefruit Seed Extract” with Synthetic Antimicrobial and Disinfectant Compounds", HerbalGram. 2012; American Botanical Council, June 05, 2012, © American Botanical Council
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Food & Nutrition
Pills & Supplements
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Restricted Calorie Intake Is Linked With Healthier Heart

June 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by U.S. and Italian researchers finds that people who have significantly restricted their caloric intake for an average of seven years have healthier, younger hearts. The researchers studied 22 people who restricted their calorie intake but ate healthy diets, and 20 people who ate a standard Western diet. Average age was about 51. The study focused on changes in heart rate variability, a measurement that tells a lot about the way the autonomic nervous system affects the heart. In the study, those who restricted their calorie intake over long periods of time had higher heart rate variability, and thus a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.
Phyllis K. Stein et al., "Caloric restriction may reverse age-related autonomic decline in humans", Aging Cell, June 06, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Aging
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Italy

Compound In Milk Helps Boost Metabolism, Increase Endurance

June 5, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A multinational team of researchers has determined that an ingredient in milk – nicotinamide riboside – boosts the activity of the gene SIRT1, which benefits metabolism and longevity. In a mouse study, animals that took nicotinamide riboside in fairly high doses while eating a high-fat diet burned more fat and were protected from obesity. Thanks to a boost in endurance, they also become better runners. The researchers suggested that the milk substance seems to offer the same benefits as resveratrol, and could help in achieving slimmer waistlines and perhaps longer lives.
CanCarles Cantó et al., " The NAD precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet induced obesity", Cell Metabolism, June 05, 2012, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Dieting & Weight Control
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Finland
Switzerland

Proposed N.Y. City Ban On Supersized Sodas May Be Missing The Mark, Experts Say

June 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
University health experts in Alabama warn that N.Y. City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s proposed ban on the sale of super-sized sodas is too narrowly focused to make much of an impact on obesity. They cited 2009 research into the effect of drinking sugar-sweetened beverages on body weight that found no significant effect on weight reduction after participants reduced their consumption. Subsequent studies have shown the same results. The researchers said they hope energy and resources will instead be focused on conducting clinical trials that will “definitively answer” questions about all of the public health actions that might significantly reduce weight, not just one.
Kathryn Kaiser, Ph.D. & Suzanne Judd, Ph.D., "Will a NYC Supersize Soda Ban Help Obesity Battle?", News release, University of Alabama at Birmingham, June 04, 2012, © University of Alabama at Birmingham
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Cooling Vests Activate Brown Fat To Burn Calories, Reduce Obesity

June 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have found that reduced temperatures activate brown fat to burn calories and reduce obesity. The researchers also found that the chemical ephedrine, used as a decongestant and bronchodilator and lately as a weight loss drug, has no impact on brown fat, though it does burn calories, albeit with some side effects like increased blood pressure. For the study, ten people received ephedrine injections or a placebo, or wore cooling vests. Both methods burned the same number of calories, but the cooling vest activated brown fat with fewer side effects.
Aaron M. Cypess et al., "Cold but not sympathomimetics activates human brown adipose tissue in vivo", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 04, 2012, © National Academy of Sciences
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Pills & Supplements
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Extreme Endurance Exercise Increases Risk Of Heart Damage

June 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Though regular exercise promotes cardiovascular health and helps prevent common chronic diseases, excessive endurance exercise can damage the heart, U.S. research finds. Chronic training for, and competition in, marathons, iron man distance triathlons, and very long distance bicycle races may cause structural changes to the heart and large arteries, leading to myocardial injury. As with drug use, safe upper dose limits do exist in physical exercise. Beyond these limits there is the risk of serious adverse effects. In the case of extreme endurance exercise, the risk of musculoskeletal trauma and cardiovascular stress “may outweigh its benefits."
James H. O’Keefe et al., "Potential Adverse Cardiovascular Effects From Excessive Endurance Exercise", Mayo Clinic Proceedings, June 04, 2012, © Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Fitness & Exercise
Heart & Cardiovascular
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Studies Support Simple Steps To Prevent Illness, Improve Health

June 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Staying healthy needn’t be a complicated affair, according to five multinational studies. In reviews of scientific literature, researchers found, for example, that frequently eating fresh fish reduces the risk of colorectal cancer, one of the deadliest forms of cancer. A meta-analysis of 14 studies found that unconventional smoking cessation aids, like  acupuncture and hypnotherapy, were a significant help in quitting smoking. Other simple steps toward a healthier life: regular teeth cleaning to improve cardiovascular health and using low-dose aspirin to reduce cancer risk.
Shengjun Wu et al., "Fish Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis", The American Journal of Medicine, June 04, 2012, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Alternative Therapies
Better For You
Dieting & Weight Control
Heart & Cardiovascular
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Cancer & Cancer Prevention
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Canada
China
Taiwan

Soy Supplements Do Not Improve Women’s Cognitive Abilities, Except Maybe Visual Memory

June 4, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A 2.5-year study of middle-age and older postmenopausal women found that soy supplements had no significant impact on overall mental abilities. The study’s lead author said there were no large effects, either positive or negative, on cognition. Soy and soy-based products contain estrogen-like compounds  called isoflavones; some women take soy supplements as an alternative to estrogen s a postmenopausal therapy. The researchers did note that women in the study who took soy supplements showed a greater improvement in visual memory (memory for faces). This could be important, they noted, but "the finding needs to be replicated in future studies."
V.W. Henderson et al., "Long-term soy isoflavone supplementation and cognition in women: A randomized, controlled trial", Neurology, June 04, 2012, © AAN Enterprises, Inc.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Women's Health
Menstruation & Menopause
Aging
Brain
Pills & Supplements
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Stricter Monitoring Of Certain Key Countries Could Help Lessen Food Poisoning Outbreaks

June 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
The increasing complexity of the global food traffic network makes it extremely difficult to determine the source of food poisoning outbreaks, a multinational study has found. The problem arises when foods contain ingredients from numerous sources. A recent study found, for example, that an ordinary “Chicken Kiev” dish served in a Dublin (Ireland) restaurant contained ingredients from 53 countries. Using information gleaned from agro-food import-export databases, the authors found that the food-transport network has highly vulnerable hotspots. A number of countries – especially those that take in many ingredients, process these into products, and act as distribution hubs – are critical. Stricter monitoring of these countries could benefit the network globally.
Mária Ercsey-Ravasz et al., "Complexity of the International Agro-Food Trade Network and Its Impact on Food Safety", PLoS ONE, June 01, 2012, © Ercsey-Ravasz et al.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Food & Nutrition
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom
Hungary
Romania

Company’s Gelatin-Free Multivitamin With Vitamin D3 Targets Muslim Women

May 31, 2012: 09:53 PM EST
Nutrition Enhancement has introduced a halal-certified gelatin-free multivitamin product with nutrients supporting the health of both men and women of all ages. Nutrition Enhancement Multivitamin is equivalent to leading brands in the market, the company says, but is formulated without gelatin, making it the only halal-certified multivitamin with 1000 IU of Vitamin D3. Vitamin D deficiency problems arise when people do not get enough sun exposure, a problem for Muslim women because of a dress code that requires wearing a scarf or Hijab. The company also makes Halal Omega-3 fish oil.
"Nutrition Enhancement Launches Halal Certified Gelatin-Free Multivitamin", Press release, Nutrition Enhancement, May 31, 2012, © Nutrition Enhancement
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Food & Nutrition
Vitamins
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Do People Really Want “Healthy” Cakes? The Argument Rages On

May 31, 2012: 09:22 AM EST
A researcher at an Australian government-funded research institute says bakers and snack makers are not doing enough to reduce fat content in their products to make them healthier. But the baking industry says it’s not only not possible to cut fat any more, consumers really don’t want it. Companies could reduce salt, sugar and fat in their products by as much as 15 percent or 20 percent without consumers knowing the difference, the researchers says. But Industry experts argue that when products are substantially reduced in total fat “they are very different in taste to what consumers are looking for." And healthy cakes are “not what people expect – people don't buy into it."
Ben Cooper, "Fat reformulation - sat fats in baked goods", just-food global news, May 31, 2012, © just-food.com
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Protein Trend Means Sales Boost For Powder, Bar Makers

May 31, 2012: 09:07 AM EST
America’s demand for protein is surging, thanks to a torrent of advice from physical trainers, diet gurus and weight-loss plans; that means big business for makers of protein powders, shakes and energy bars. The boost in protein demand is also benefiting retail grocers, whose shelves are now packed with protein products, replacing space once stocked with high-fiber and low-fat products. The irony is that, even without the protein powders and bars, Americans already eat plenty of protein, experts say. A diet survey from 2007-2008 shows “men and women commonly consuming more protein than needed, sometimes by a third or more,” the AP reports.
Michael Hill, "Beyond meat: Americans preoccupied with protein", BusinessWeek, May 31, 2012, via Associated Press, © The Associated Press
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Food & Nutrition
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vitamin D3 Is Better At Raising Vitamin D Levels In The Blood

May 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by British and Canadian researchers finds that vitamin D3 – found in eggs and oily fish – is more beneficial to health than the more common vitamin D2. Researchers analyzed data from 10 separate studies involving more than 1,000 people, finding that vitamin D3 works better at raising vitamin D levels in the blood. Vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is necessary for bone and muscle health. Vitamin D2 is the variety used most often to fortify foods.
L. Tripkovic et al., "Comparison of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 supplementation in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status", Clinical Nutrition, May 31, 2012, © American Society for Nutrition
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Pills & Supplements
Vitamins
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Canada
Europe
United Kingdom

New Training Technique Improves Runners’ Performance, While Cutting Training Time

May 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Danish research involving the novel “10-20-30” interval training technique for running shows that runners can improve performance in distance events while cutting their training time in half. 10-20-30 training includes a low-intensity 1-km warm-up, followed by 3-4 blocks of 5 minutes running. Each block is separated by two minutes of rest. A block consists of 5 consecutive 1-minute intervals divided into 30, 20 and 10 seconds of running at a low, moderate and near maximal intensity, respectively. The method is easily adapted to a busy schedule: a  total of 20-30 minutes including warm-up is all that is needed.
T. P. Gunnarsson et al., "The 10-20-30 training concept improves performance and health profile in moderately trained runners", Journal of Applied Physiology, May 31, 2012, © American Physiological Society
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Fitness & Exercise
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Denmark

Dark Chocolate Reduces Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure – Study

May 31, 2012: 03:06 AM EST
An Australian study involving 2,013 people with high blood pressure and pre-diabetic metabolic syndrome found that consumption of dark chocolate lowers both blood pressure and cholesterol. Participants in the study had no history of cardiovascular disease and were not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy. Researchers said daily intake of 100 g (3.5 oz.) of dark chocolate reduced cardiovascular events by 85 in a population of 10,000 over ten years. To be effective,  the chocolate needs to be dark and at least 60-70 percent cocoa, or formulated to be enriched with polyphenols.
Ella Zomer et al., "The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of dark chocolate consumption as prevention therapy in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease: best case scenario analysis using a Markov model", British Medical Journal (BMJ), May 31, 2012, © Open Access
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Heart & Cardiovascular
Preventative Care
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Lupin-Based Breakfast Cereal: Healthier Than Wheat-Based Products?

May 30, 2012: 10:34 AM EST
An Australian university professor has developed a breakfast cereal based on the traditional feed grain lupin that, he says, is healthier than wheat-based breakfast cereals. The cereal is gluten-free, high in fiber and protein, low in fat, and cholesterol free. In addition, the cereal has a low glycemic index, so it takes longer for the digestive system to process, helping people to avoid hunger pangs and snacking.
"Super Lupin breakfast cereal a world first", Curtin University, May 30, 2012, © Curtin University of Technology
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Dieting & Weight Control
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Physical Activity And Fruit/Vegetable Consumption Lower Mortality Rates For Older Women

May 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Univ. of Michigan researchers who studied 713 women aged 70 to 79 years found that those who were most physically active and ate the most fruits and vegetables were eight times more likely to survive the five-year follow-up period than women with the lowest rates. Information for the study was gathered from participant questionnaires about physical activity and from measurements of blood levels of carotenoids, beneficial pigments from fruits and vegetables that the body turns into antioxidants. Key findings: women in the most active group at baseline had a 71 percent lower five-year death rate than the women in the least active group; women in the highest carotenoid group had a 46 percent lower five-year death rate.
Emily J. Nicklett et al., "Fruit and Vegetable Intake, Physical Activity, and Mortality in Older Community-Dwelling Women", Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, May 30, 2012, © The American Geriatrics Society
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Women's Health
Other Women's Health
Aging
Better For You
Dieting & Weight Control
Fitness & Exercise
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplements May Prevent Age-Related Vision Loss

May 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Supplementing the diets of older people with DHA – an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish like salmon and anchovies – prevents the accumulation of a toxic molecule in the retina that causes vision loss, Canadian research has found. The toxin (A2E, a constituent of the toxin lipofuscin) doubles as people age, but the researchers found in lab tests with mice that DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) stopped the accumulation of the toxin. The researchers have launched a clinical study involving people with age-related macular degeneration to see if certain genetic markers for the disease will respond better to increasing amounts of DHA in their diets.
B. Dornstauder et al., "Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation Prevents Age-Related Functional Losses and A2E Accumulation in the Retina", Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, May 30, 2012, © Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Eyes
Other Food & Nutrition
Other Conditions
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Children Learn Healthy Eating Habits By Imitating Their Parents

May 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Imitation is not only the sincerest form of flattery, it’s also the best way to teach kids healthy eating habits, a U.S. study finds. The research focused on the eating habits of low-income families, finding that preschool children of mothers who led by example -- persuading rather than forcing their kids to eat fruits and vegetables -- tended to eat healthier foods. Parents are  better off adopting balanced eating habits themselves, subtly controlling their children's diet quality by not bringing unhealthy foods into the house. Conversely, overly restricting certain foods can lead to unhealthy eating.
M. Murashima et al., "Feeding behaviors of low-income mothers: directive control relates to a lower BMI in children, and a nondirective control relates to a healthier diet in preschoolers", American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 30, 2012, © American Society for Nutrition
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Food & Nutrition
Kid's Health
Women's Health
Pre-School/School
Other Women's Health
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Study Links Mediterranean Diet To Improved Mental, Physical Health

May 29, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by Spanish researchers has linked the Mediterranean diet – fruit, vegetables, pulses (beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils etc.), fish, olive oil and nuts – to improved mental and physical health. Scientists analyzed the influence of the Mediterranean diet on the quality of life of a sample of more than 11,000 university students over four years. Dietary intake data was taken at the beginning and measured after four years. Those who stuck more to the Mediterranean diet scored higher on the quality of life questionnaire in terms of physical and mental well-being. The link was even stronger in terms of physical quality of life.
P. Henríquez Sánchez et al., "Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and quality of life in the SUN Project", European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 29, 2012, © Nature Publishing Group
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

Bananas Are A Better Carb/Nutrient Source Than Sports Drinks Before Strenuous Exercise

May 29, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have found that bananas are more beneficial to vigorous exercisers than sports drinks. The study showed that half a banana given to trained cyclists every fiftyeen minutes during a 75-kilometer road race (nearly 3 hours long) provided antioxidants not found in sports drinks, plus fiber, potassium, vitamin B6 and a healthier blend of sugars. According to one of the researchers, the findings show that healthy carbohydrate sources like bananas "before and after exercise will support athletic performance just as well as a sports drink."
David C. Nieman et al., " Bananas as an Energy Source during Exercise: A Metabolomics Approach", PLoS ONE, May 29, 2012, © Nieman et al.
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Better For You
Energy
Fitness & Exercise
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Serving Size Reminder In Potato Chip Tubes Curbs Over-Eating

May 28, 2012: 05:33 AM EST
Cornell University researchers report that they have discovered a way to help people curb the nearly insatiable appetite for potato chips packaged in tubes. An experiment involving 98 college students found that placing edible serving size markers – dyed red – placed in the tubes serve as subconscious stop signs. Unaware of why some of the chips were red, students served potato chip tubes consumed about 50 percent less than their peers: 20 and 24 chips on average for the seven-chip (one serving) and 14-chip (two servings) segmented tubes. This compared with 45 chips in the control group.
Andrew Geier et al., "Red potato chips: Segmentation cues can substantially decrease food intake", Health Psychology, May 28, 2012, © American Psychological Association
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Other Food & Nutrition
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hazelnuts Found To Be A Good Source Of Omega-3 Fatty Acids For Infant Formula

May 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A multinational team of researchers has found that adding omega-3-rich fats derived from hazelnuts to infant formula provides nutrients essential for development of the brain and other organs. Normally, unborn babies receive omega-3 fatty acids from their mother in the final three months of pregnancy. But premature babies miss these nutrients. Formula-fed -- and even breast-fed -- infants often do not get enough either. According to the researchers, hazelnut oil contains fatty acids DHA and ARA at the same positions found on fats in human milk, and are therefore more suitable than fats derived from algae, the current source.
Dilek Turan et al., "Production of Human Milk Fat Analogue Containing Docosahexaenoic and Arachidonic Acids", Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, May 23, 2012, © American Chemical Society
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Kid's Health
Women's Health
Babies
Pregnancy
Better For You
Other Food & Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Middle East- Africa
Saudi Arabia
Turkey

Postmenopausal Calcium Supplements Significantly Increase The Risk Of Heart Attack

May 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
New research conducted in New Zealand and Scotland highlights the significant risk of heart attack associated with taking calcium supplements after menopause to prevent bone thinning. Researchers analyzed data from a German study of 24,000 middle-aged and older women over 11 years. Participants whose diets included a moderate amount (820 mg daily) of calcium from all sources, including supplements, had a 31 percent lower risk of having a heart attack than those in the bottom 25 percent of calcium intake. But when researchers looked at vitamin/mineral supplement intake alone, they found an 86 percent greater risk of heart attack.
M. J. Bolland et al., "Calcium supplements with or without vitamin D and risk of cardiovascular events", BMJ, May 23, 2012, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Food & Nutrition
Women's Health
Menstruation & Menopause
Aging
Bones & Joints
Heart & Cardiovascular
Pills & Supplements
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
Europe
New Zealand
United Kingdom

African-American Men Quietly Endure Healthier Diet At Home, But Splurge When Away

May 22, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A focus-group study of 83 African-American men has found that most will put up with healthier dietary changes at home to keep the peace, but will often overindulge on foods they like when they’re away from the house. The majority of men interviewed in focus groups said their wives did not consult with them before imposing a healthier diet. But to avoid conflict, the men acquiesced in the changes to maintain a happy home. According to one of the researchers, men “compensate for the dissatisfaction of not eating what they want by making unhealthier choices outside the home."
Julie Ober Allen et al., " “She Looks out for the Meals, Period”: African American Men's Perceptions of How Their Wives Influence Their Eating Behavior and Dietary Health", Health Psychology, May 22, 2012, © American Psychological Association
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Men's Health
Other Men's Health
Dieting & Weight Control
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Americans Are Concerned About Their Diet, But Confused About What’s Healthy And Nutritious

May 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Constantly changing nutritional guidance makes it difficult for a large majority – 76 percent – of Americans to know what to believe about a healthful diet, a national food and health survey finds, and more than half feel it’s easier to do their taxes than to figure out what’s healthy to eat. Although 58 percent of Americans say they give a lot of thought to their diet – and 55 percent are trying to lose weight – only one in five believe their diet is healthy, and 23 percent describe their diet as extremely or very unhealthy.
International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation, "2012 Food & Health Survey", IFIC Survey, May 23, 2012, © IFIC
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Dieting & Weight Control
Heart & Cardiovascular
Other Food & Nutrition
Diabetes
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vigorous Exercise Seems To Reduce The Risk Of Psoriasis

May 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study finds that psoriasis can now be added to the list of systemic inflammation diseases that can be prevented or alleviated by vigorous physical activity. Previous studies have shown that similar diseases – type 2 diabetes, colon cancer, coronary artery disease and breast cancer – have been eased by exercise. In the current study, researchers analyzed from 86,665 women who did not have psoriasis, with its systemic inflammation and scaling of the skin, in 1991. Follow-ups in 1997 and 2001 found 1,026 cases. Those who participated in at least 21 hours of vigorous exercise a week were 25 to 30 percent less likely to experience psoriasis.
Jiali Han, "The Association Between Physical Activity and the Risk of Incident Psoriasis", Archives of Dermatology, May 21, 2012, © American Medical Association
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Women's Health
Other Women's Health
Alternative Therapies
Better For You
Fitness & Exercise
Skin
Other Conditions
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hearts Of Otherwise Healthy Obese Adolescents Are Already Impaired – Study

May 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by researchers in Kosovo that looked at the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cardiac function among overweight adolescents finds that even though no symptoms of heart disease were showing, obese participants showed evidence of cardiac damage. Researchers studied 97 healthy adolescents who were measured an divided into lean, overweight and obese groups. Measurements were taken of heart size and heart function in all three groups. Obese adolescents with no symptoms of heart disease had damaged hearts with thicker walls, and impaired systolic and diastolic function. Both structural and functional measures correlated with BMI, and suggest a reason why obesity is a risk for heart disease.
Gani Bajraktari et al., "Obese Adolescents Have Heart Damage", News release, presentation at the annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, May 21, 2012, © European Society of Cardiology
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Body
Conditions
Kid's Health
Pre-School/School
Teen
Heart & Cardiovascular
Obesity
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Albania

Cupcake Craze Is Symbol Of Global Sugar Addiction

May 18, 2012: 09:08 PM EST
British author Damian Thompson (“The Fix: How Addiction is Invading Our Lives and Taking Over Your World”), convinced by scientific evidence and personal observations, believes that sugar – delivered in the form of cupcakes, cookies, cakes, etc. – is as addictive as cocaine and a major global health problem. Perhaps the most obvious example of the problem is today’s cupcake craze. Thompson says people say they like cupcakes because they are so “retro” and are a delicious reminder of their childhoods. On the contrary, he argues, “We like them because they allow us to mainline sugar.”
Damian Thompson, "Why cupcakes are the new cocaine", The Telegraph, May 18, 2012, © Telegraph Media Group Limited
Domains
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Conditions
Food & Nutrition
Other Food & Nutrition
Other Conditions
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom
<<31323334353637383940>> Total results:5062 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.