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Supplements Sector Adopts SAE Reports

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
The supplements industry now has to meet the same adverse event (SAE) reporting standards as the pharmaceutical industry. Serious adverse events reports must now be referred to the Food and Drug Administration, and supplements makers must now keep a record of less-serious events. Both the Natural Products Association and the Council for Responsible Nutrition support the move. However, the American Herbal Products Association has asked the FDA to clarify aspects of the ruling, particularly use of the term “injured person” rather than “patient” or “subject” in SAE reports.
"Supplements Industry Commits to Adverse-Event Reporting", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Onions Are Antioxidants

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
Onions can be powerful antioxidants and anti-browning agents, according to Spanish researchers. Onion waste was made into a paste and mildly pasteurized, and was found to contain high levels of quercetin and antioxidant activity, says the report in Food Chemistry. More than 450,000 tonnes of onion waste are produced in the European Union each year.
"Onion By-Products Offer Antioxidant Potential", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © 2008, Penton Media, Inc.
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Coca Cola Gets into Chinese Medicine

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST

Coca Cola has invested $80 million in the Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences in Beijing, initially to develop drinks incorporating Chinese herbs and formulas. The academy is affiliated to the Ministry of Public Health, and Coca Cola is the first foreign company to be allowed to use the institute. China is the company’s fourth biggest market, with sales doubling since 2002 and accounting for five percent of global sales.

Shane Starling, "Coca Cola Invests in Traditional Chinese Medicine", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Fiber Keeps its Glow

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
Fiber is keeping its hold on the market, with Frost & Sullivan predicting that sales will reach $400 million in the US by 2011, double the 2004 level. Euromonitor puts the global market for foods marketing high-fiber claims at $80 billion rising to $95 billion by 2011. Prebiotic fibers are becoming much better known in North America, notching up sales of $400 million, although they are much more established in Europe. Companies such as California’s BI Nutraceuticals are expanding fiber’s uses into supplements for the functional market. Others such as Alberta-based Cevena with its ViscoFiber have concentrated on the supplements market. Belgium’s Beneo-Orafti says about 21,000 food and supplement products were launched in 2006 in Western Europe, Asia and North America containing its chicory-sourced inulin and oligofructose ingredients. The company has commissioned at least another 300 and has submitted five health claims to the European Commission. Cost is an important factor, with psyllium selling for about $7 per kilo compared with $25 per kilo for a new arrival, salba from Peru. The difference between soluble and insoluble fibers is being stressed, which is making flax – containing both – important. But, warns Pizzey's Milling of Manitoba, producers must spell out the different effects and benefits of different fiber types. France’s Roquette is promoting Nutriose as a fiber-boosting ingredient and sugar replacement. Datamonitor says more attention needs to be paid to marketing as fiber does not have the newness of other ingredients and is associated with older consumers. The research company says the concept of high fiber intake should be marketed as a weight-loss solution or as a satiety-enhancing ingredient. Some companies are already doing this, such as Danone with its Lasting Satisfaction yogurt.
Shane Starling, "Good Fibrations", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Studies Puts Echinacea in Favorable Light

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
Consuming echinacea can reduce the chances of catching common colds by 58 percent, United States scientists said after reviewing 14 studies. The review, published in the Lancet, also found that echinacea (Echinacea purpurea) can lessen the duration of colds by 1.5 days. Negative media coverage has lead to a fall in sales of Echinacea recently, but the latest study, by the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, found a majority of studies demonstrated the effectiveness of echinacea in fighting colds.
"Echinacea Proven (Once Again) to Fight Colds", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Soy Good for the Heart

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
Soy is high on the popularity list of approved ingredients for heart health. The Food and Drug Administration says 25g of soy protein daily is needed to lower cholesterol. Other mainstream ingredients approved by the FDA are: omega-3 fatty acids, which have a rosy market outlook because new micro-encapsulation technologies are making it easier to incorporate fish oils into diets; coenzyme Q10, now available in forms other than supplements; whole grains, which can reduce risk of heart failure by 28 percent; niacin, which can reduce the risk of heart problems; magnesium; sterols; vitamin E, although there is controversy following conflicting studies; grape-seed extract and oligomeric proantho-cyanidins; and Vitamin K2, made by bacteria in the gut and found in natto, a Japanese fermented soy product. Blending all these ingredients into one product may not work as each has specific effects when taken in the right dosages and under the right conditions.
Chris O'Brien, "Top Ingredients for Heart Health", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Canada, EU worry over food safety

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
A brief note mentioned that Canada is worried that it lags in food safety and plans to introduce mandatory product recalls, while the European Food Standards Authority wants a “farm-to-fork” policy to tackle the high rate of infectious diseases transmitted from animals to humans.
"Canada's Reg Future", February 01, 2008, via Functional Ingredients, © 2008, Penton Media, Inc.
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Caffeine Perks up the Brain

February 1, 2008: 12:00 AM EST
Caffeine does have health benefits, even in low doses, says a review of trials conducted over the last 15 years. The analysis published by the British Nutrition Foundation highlights improved alertness, short-term recall and reaction time, better mood and reduced levels of fatigue from low to moderate intake levels. One study found improved exercise performance of 12 percent, especially in endurance activities. Another found lower ratings of perceived exhaustion accounted for 30 percent of the improvement in exercise performance. It is thought that caffeine influences mood and performance by acting on neurotransmitters in the brain.
"Caffeine Health Benefits Highlighted in Study Review", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Jury Out on Multivitamins

February 28, 2007: 12:00 AM EST
Harvard Men's Health Watch says that people should stop taking multivitamins until the link between folate and prostate cancer is determined. Researchers say that there are many unanswered questions about folic acid and cancer. One popular theory, still unproven, suggests that timing and dose may explain folate's apparently contradictory effects on cancer. But the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) says there is no reason to stop taking multivitamins. Many people have inadequate diets, and the supplements help to fill the gaps, the Council says. Harvard Men's Health Watch says that people should consider taking a vitamin D supplement if they do stop taking multivitamins, because many people get too little of this in their daily diets.
Alex McNally, "Give Up Multivitamins, Harvard Warns", NutraIngredients, February 28, 2007, © Decision News Media
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